Tag Archives: waste not want not

Giving It A Go

22 Oct

It’s almost half a century since I rocked up, in flares and platforms, at the Foundation Course in Swansea Art School, determined to be a painter. Then I did the module in printmaking and retired my paintbrushes. Until the pandemic lockdown started in Spring last year. We were only allowed out of the house for an hour a day and I discovered Ed Sumner’s Cheese and Wine Painting Club on Facebook when I was looking for something to do to pass the time. After so many decades I thought, “Why not give it a go”. So for 15 months I have been copying great works of art, which is Ed’s way of teaching, and that gave me the confidence to start choosing my own subjects to paint, with varying degrees of success. This landscape in acrylics is based on a pastel drawing I did en plein air at Birkrigg Common in the Lake District last month.

I used a textured canvas, I scrape leftover paint from the Painting Club sessions onto spare canvases. Waste not, want not. Then I applied the coloured “ground” that Ed Sumner recommends doing. And from then on, I followed the original drawing, using Liquitex Heavy Body acrylic paints and a mixture of brushes and palette knives. I can see the influence of some of the artists we have studied, especially van Gogh and Hockney; I need to keep working at it to find my own style.

Here’s my original drawing. I prefer it to the painting, I love the immediacy and the nature of the Daler Rowney soft oil pastels onto a very rough Khadi paper. But I’m still a novice at painting so I must get more practice in.

My lovely nephew (in the middle) along with these other wonderful young people have benefitted from the Children In Need charity and now they’re giving something back. They’re the Surprise Squad (more about them here) and you can follow their adventures on BBC1s “The One Show“, 15th – 18th November. I know that times are hard, but if you can spare a quid or two, please consider donating to Children In Need (here). They really do make a difference to young lives. Thank you xxx

Scrapings

14 Oct

leftover dancers

Waste not, want not. That’s what my Nana used to say. It’s stuck with me through my life. So when I have some acrylic paint left over from my Faking Fridays, (at The Cheese And Wine Painting Club) I’ve been scraping it onto scraps of heavyweight leftover paper, like Bockingford. I had a bit that I had scribbled on ages ago – some very quick figures. So I’ve used them as the basis and scraped paint on top. It’s very rough but I like the energy in it.

Looking Back (With A Kitten)

3 Sep

SONY DSC

Oh the glamour of being an artist. Sorting through my drawers. I decided to spend a bit of time this evening organising my plans chest, which meant rediscovering some of my older work. It was good, remembering how I’d done things a while back. This mixed media piece started as a drawing with a life model – my cat Sparta Puss, who was a kitten at the time, ran in playing with a ball of rolled up paper. I was going through a phase of preparing large sheets of beautiful paper – Bockingford, Somerset, BFK Rives, with random squeegeeing (a bit like Gerhard Richter) and screen prints to build up layers of background textures. Then I collaged and drew on top. The blanket that the model is lying on is made up of a ripped up linocut print that I ended up not liking. I painted all the little fragments with oil glazes before I stuck them down. Waste not, want not.

 

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

In this one, I combined the image of the bird with snippets of text of things my Nana used to say. She used to take me to Swansea Museum a lot when I was small and I could hear her voice in the back of my head as I was sitting and drawing the birds and bugs.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

 

Scribbling With Paint

30 Aug

coll 12

I normally scribble with pens, pencils, charcoal, graphite but as I’m doing a lot of painting recently, my pandemic challenge is to improve my painting skills, I sometimes end up with leftover paint. So I’ve been rummaging around in my drawers for leftover paper and use mostly palette knives to scribble the paint onto lovely papers – this is a Bockingford which has a very heavy texture.

 

 

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

In this one, I combined the image of the bird with snippets of text of things my Nana used to say. She used to take me to Swansea Museum a lot when I was small and I could hear her voice in the back of my head as I was sitting and drawing the birds and bugs.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

 

More Scrapings

27 Aug

landscape

I’ve filled this A3 sheet of Bockingford paper with the scrapings from the paintings I’ve been doing recently. The paint is too expensive to just chuck, Liquitex Heavy Body acrylic, and as my Nanna used to say, “waste not, want not”. I’ve put it on mostly with a palette knife and the heavy texture of the Bockingford shows through where it’s been well scraped. It’ll come for collage papers.

 

 

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

In this one, I combined the image of the bird with snippets of text of things my Nana used to say. She used to take me to Swansea Museum a lot when I was small and I could hear her voice in the back of my head as I was sitting and drawing the birds and bugs.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

 

Messing About With Gouache And Buttercream

20 Aug

figure 1

I had a bit of gouache left over from a design I was working on so, waste not want not, I grabbed some Bockingford paper that was knocking about and messed about with it, not using any source material, just brushing the paint across the paper for the sheer fun of it. It flows so well and makes great marks. Then I made a cake for one of my young relatives who got his – good – GCSE results today, a three layer lemon sponge filled and covered with lemon buttercream. I’ve no idea what it tasted like, because I rarely eat cake, but he seemed happy enough.

lemon buttercream

 

Scrapings and Surrealists

18 Aug

scrapings

I’m very frugal. I was raised by the “waste not, want not” generation and I try to use up everything. I’ve been doing some painting practice through the lockdown and I’ve taken to scraping the paint off my palette and onto nice paper. It’s very good paint, Liquitex Easy Body acrylic, onto Bockingford paper. The early 20th century Surrealists  used to do random stuff to get inspiration. I don’t know if I’ll be inspired to take this one further, but at least it can be ripped up for collage.

 

 

A Pandemic Mask

8 Apr

Mask

So after several days of cutting cloth, cutting blocks, printing and sewing here’s my first pandemic mask. I carved the word “isolate” into a little lino block as the basis for the work. I hope it will be the first of many.

sewing 1

I learnt as I went along. My sewing skills are rusty – so are some of my pins! I didn’t allow enough time for the ink to dry – it’s much quicker on paper.

sewing 2

I used my lovely hand cranked Edwardian Singer sewing machine, now an antique – it was made in 1904. It has this beautiful sphynx-like decoration. Gorgeous.

 

 

Ideas And Fish Pie

5 Apr

masks 2

I’ve been thinking a lot since the lockdown started about doing some artwork based around the Covid19 virus and the way our lives have changed. But I’m not someone who can force it and it’s had to mull around inside for a while and now the ideas are creeping out from wherever they come from.

masks 1

I had a spare cotton sheet hanging around, I bought the wrong size and I’ve been wondering what to do with it since. It’s a fitted sheet so I cut off the elasticated bits – they’re useful – and then cut a number of rectangles, 15 x 22 cms. The next stage is to carve a small lino block …… tomorrow probably …..

fish pie

And I made a classic fish pie for tea. Proper comfort food. Suits the times we’re living in. There’s enough left over for tomorrow too. I love eating leftovers – waste not, want not as my Nana used to say xxx

 

 

 

An Inspirational Talk

25 Jul

waste not 2a

Husb and I went to a talk by the veteran artist Hanlyn Davies at our local art gallery, The Glynn Vivian, this evening. I really appreciated it and learnt a lot. I’ve been trying to break away from always working directly from life, tapping into my imagination, but I’ve been finding it hard going. Watching Hanlyn run through a slide show of over 50 years work has given me a bit of confidence to let go a bit and keep experimenting. I added a bit of red paint to the canvas board I started painting last week, when I was using up leftover Liquitex acrylic paints at the end of a teaching session. There wasn’t much left this week. It’s going to be interesting to see how this develops, I’ll keep it intuitive.

 

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