Tag Archives: Wales

Cutting Revenge

27 Jan
3 cutting

The first cuts

Today I started cutting the little lino block of the word “Revenge” which will be stamped onto the screenprint I’m developing for the artist Jamie Reid and GS Artists.

2 cutting

The drawing ready to transfer to the lino block, in reverse

First, I had to decide whether to cut the block in wood or lino. The MDF is easier to cut and it’s easy to transfer the design using carbon paper, as the surface isn’t oily like lino. But the lino has a slightly rough surface which I quite like when it’s printed up and I think its hardness is an advantage because it’s better for fine cutting. So I went with the lino. I love the little curls….

 

1 cutting

Choosing between MDF wood or brown lino

 

Jamie’s solo show, “Dragon’s Revenge” runs at Galerie Simpson, 217, High Street, Swansea until St. David’s Day, March 1st.

dragons-revenge

Tracing Revenge

26 Jan

1 tracing

 

I’ve started making a new piece of work. It will be an original print in an edition of 75 designed by artist, activist and troublemaker Jamie Reid. I’m producing it at Swansea Print Workshop for GS Artists and the first stage is to cut a stamp from lino or wood. This is where I start, tracing from Jamie’s original with a soft 2B pencil.

His solo exhibition, ” Dragons Revenge, Political Work, 1970-2020″ opened at GS Artists at 217, High Street, Swansea this weekend and Jamie will be visiting to do an “in-conversation” with Rhys Mwyn on February 22nd which includes a vegan lunch for £3.50 – there are a very few tickets left here. You can see the show until March 1st and if you want to get hold of one of the original prints, check them out here

 

dragons-revenge

And Finally….

25 Jan

Mari Port Talbot

Here’s the last of the Mari Lwyds I sketched at the recent Gower Wassail. This one’s from Port Talbot, the Cwmafan Mari who was bedecked loads of bows. That should be the last of the Mari Lwyds until next New Year …..

The Dim Mare

24 Jan

Mari Gwyr

It’s been Mari Lwyd season here in Wales, an ancient tradition harking back to the worship of the Celtic horse goddess. There have been quite a few Maris stalking the area and they’re all different, they all have their own personalities. Here’s a quick sketch of Mari Gwyr, the Gower Mari. She’s plainer than most and her strange headgear, a cross between a beret and a beanie, make her look a bit dim, in my opinion.

Here Comes Mayhem

23 Jan

Plygain 6

At the Plygain celebration over the weekend, after there had been plenty of Welsh carols sung and a break for tea and snacks, we had some surprise visitors. Some local Wassailers accompanied by the Coppertown Mari Lwyd (Mari Trecopr). We moved quickly from traditional Xmas hymns to Mari-led mayhem.

Plygain 5

The Mari Lwyd arrives with her companions and knocks on the door to be let in. It’s the job of the people inside to keep the mischieveous Mari out so there’s a battle of wits and rhyme – a sort of ancient rap battle – until the Mari and her gang are let in. This frisky Mari tried to knock back a glass of mulled wine!

This wonderful evening of Welsh tradition was led by David Pitt (who inhabits the Mari) and Margot Morgan, who organises the Aderyn Du (Black Bird) Brynmill Community Choir.

Scribbling Singing

21 Jan

Plygain 3

Here are a couple more sketches I did at the Plygain celebration last weekend in Swansea. Plygain is a Welsh language carolling tradition going back at least to the 13th century. It had almost died out but is now going through a healthy revival. In the past, families would have precious books of Plygain carols handed down through generations. Plygain is competitive – carollers take it in turns to sing and no carol can be performed more than once during the service, so these ancient family books of Plygain carols are precious.

Plygain 4

I sketched the carollers as they sang. The top drawing was done using the continuous line method – it’s easier to judge perspective and proportion I find. Then a few speed sketches just of heads.

Toffee Evening, Noson Gyflaith

20 Jan

Plygain 2

I carried on sketching at the Welsh Plygain celebration, while all the rest sang. Traditionally, Plygain took place in church at around 3am on Xmas morning and ended at first light. People generally stayed up all night, doing all sorts of things to keep awake. One that was popular with younger people was the making of Cyflaith (toffee) and Christmas Eve was often known as Noson Gyflaith – Toffee Evening. Games were played and stories told to stop people from dozing off.

Plygain is unaccompanied carol singing in the Welsh language and traditionally was only sung by men, but these days it’s undergoing a revival and everyone can join in. I sketched some of the men at last night’s Plygain. I used the continuous line method as I find it’s the best to get the right proportions and perspective in a roomful of people.

Drawing The Singing

19 Jan

Plygain 1

Husb and I went to a Plygain celebration this evening, a very traditional Welsh singing event. Plygain was at it’s height between the 17th and 19th centuries, although there is a mention of something similar in the Red Book of Hergest in the 13th century. But by the early 19th century opposition from the church sent it into decline and it only survived in a few places in Wales. Like many other traditions though, it’s making a comeback. I don’t like singing so I scribbled instead.

The Cheeky Mari From Pembrokeshire

18 Jan

Mari benfro

This is another sketch of a Mari Lwyd I did last weekend at the Hen Galan festivities in the Gower Heritage Centre. This Mari came all the way from Pembrokeshire and her keeper knew who she was when she was alive – she was a stallion! But he’s been reincarnated as a Mari Lwyd, linking back thousands of years to the Celtic goddess Epona, or Rhiannon in Welsh mythology. Each of the Mari Lwyds is different, they have their own personalities and Mari Benfro (Pembroke Mari) is exceptionally cheeky and lively.

 

Rebecca And Her Riots

17 Jan

Dinefwr 3

Husb and I went to a fabulous exhibition that opened this evening at the National Trust’s Newton House in Dinefwr near Llandeilo. It’s by Cardiff artist and printmaker John Abell. Called ‘Becca And Her Children’, it’s inspired by the Rebecca Riots that happened in the area in the early 19th century.

Dinefwr 2

John has been doing a residency there, producing paintings, small drypoint prints and huge linocuts. They are lush, so complex.

Dinefwr

The historic venue is a fabulous setting for the work. The house and grounds are worth a day out in their own right as well. The exhibition continues to April the 20th.

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