Tag Archives: Van Gogh

Finished Faking van Gogh’s Sunset

6 Dec

vg sunset 6

Just finished faking another painting that I started last Friday with painter Ed Sumner’s Cheese and Wine Painting Club on Facebook. It’s one of van Gogh’s earlier paintings, called Sunset. I used Liquitex Heavy Body acrylic paint onto a stretched canvas. It was interesting to work from a very dark purple background and to scratch through the lighter paint layers to create most of the trees.

 

 

 

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left and to see the complete image.

Inspired by drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artefacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

Yet Another Faking Friday …. with van Gogh ….

4 Dec

vg sunset 5

 

It Friday so it must be Faking day with the Cheese and Wine Painting Club on Facebook. This week we’re faking a van Gogh painting of a sunset. I think it’s one of his earlier ones. I think another hour should do it – but I always say that! This is my 26th lunchtime fake but the painter who runs the club, Ed Sumner, has been doing it since the beginning of the firts lockdown in March. He keeps a video of each session and they’re on the Facebook page – I think he’s done about 37 now.

Finished Faking Another Vincent

9 Nov

wheat 7

And here’s another fake, hot off the easel! It’s a copy of the van Gogh “Wheatfield” that I started in last Friday’s Cheese and Wine Painting Club over on Facebook. I’m losing count now but I think it’s about 24 that I’ve done since April. The session’s tutor, painter Ed Sumner, has been running these weekly since the first lockdown started, offering tuition for a donation or free for those who can’t afford it.

 

 

The subject of next Friday’s Cheese and Wine Painting Club is Rousseau’s “The Mandrill” – please click here to take a look.

 

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left and to see the complete image.

Inspired by drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artefacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

Faking Vincent

6 Nov

wheat 4

This afternoon’s Cheese and Wine Painting Club on Facebook was about van Gogh and this lovely painting of a wheatfield and cypress trees. The session is an hour and a half but I rarely finish in that time. I reckon I have perhaps a couple more hours on this, so that’s something for the weekend.

I use Liquitex Heavy Body acrylic paints and Daler Rowney brushes for acrylics onto a primed canvas from Wilkinsons. The painting club has been running every week since the beginning of the first UK lockdown in March. Painter Ed Sumner is a great teacher and it’s suitable for all ability levels. Ed asks people who can afford to make a donation through Paypal or Eventbrite so that people who can’t afford to pay can join in, which is a really nice thing to do – he has to earn a living after all. Ed’s next Friday class is Rousseau’s “The Mandrill” – please click here to take a look.

 

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left and to see the complete image.

Inspired by drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artefacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

 

Flowery Faking Friday

19 Jun

anemones 6

I did this painting earlier today with the Cheese and Wine Painting Club on Facebook, it’s a weekly session led by the artist Ed Sumner. I’m not a big fan of painting but I thought that I’d make an effort to improve my skills during the pandemic lockdown and I’ve done six of these so far. This week’s artwork is a copy of ‘Anemones’ by Vincent van Gogh. I used Liquitex Heavy Body acrylic paint onto a stretched and primed canvas, with Daler Rowney ‘simply…’ brushes.

I like the way that Ed Sumner takes us through the process – at high speed – only an hour and a half to finish a painting. I’m learning so much about paint application and composition and I’ve always been a fan of studying the great artists, copying their work and learning from them. Next week we’ll be copying one of Ed’s own paintings which has a massive expanse of sky – that’ll be a challenge – I don’t so sky …. Follow the link here to find out more.

 

Finished One, Started Another

10 May

Starry Night

I spent another couple of hours finishing my copy of van Gogh’s Starry Night today, that’s about 5 and a half hours in all. I don’t know how long it took Vincent. I learnt an awful lot from doing it, about handling paint and also about Vincent’s technique. The work is much richer and more multi-layered than I had thought. Looking at the comments posted on the Cheese and Wine Painting Club, which hosted the original session, a lot of the participants thought it was the hardest one yet. The composition is quite simple, but the application of the paint is very complex.

I’m inspired now to do a painting of my own. Not something I normally do but I’m really enjoying this lockdown detour. Here’s the beginning. Can you see what it is yet? 😀

Sparta Starter

The next family-friendly session of the Cheese and Wine Painting Club is Friday May 15th at midday and the painting will be Picasso’s Girl With Red Beret. It’s free for those who need it to be with donations from those who can afford to chip in a bit.

Starry Starry Cat

9 May

Starry 2

I carried on with the painting I started yesterday with the Facebook Cheese and Wine Painting Club. It’s van Gogh’s Starry Night and it’s far more complex than I’d realised. I did an hour and a half yesterday and two hours today and still a ways to go. Sparta Puss joined me for a while.

Starry 3

I’m using Liquitex acrylic heavy body paint onto a Winsor & Newton canvas. It’s weird painting, not something I normally do, but it’s so interesting to analyse a famous artwork and see what has gone into it. I uploaded a better image of Starry Night today and saw loads more detail in it.

Faking It

8 May

Starry 1

This is the second Friday that I’ve joined in with the midday paintalong hosted by the Cheese and Wine Painting Club on Facebook. It’s a one and  a half hour session painting a classic artwork. Last week was a Matisse and today, van Gogh’s Starry Night. I’ve a few more hours work on this, but it’s coming along. It makes me realise how complex it is.

 

 

Shadowbeach

12 Jun

shadowbeach

 

I’m lucky to live near one of the loveliest beaches anywhere, Swansea Bay, and Husb and I often wander down for a stroll. I used to sketch it a lot but haven’t done for ages because it got boring; I couldn’t find anything new to draw. I had recently been thinking about the drawings of van Gogh and his wonderful expressive mark-making and so today I decided to take a different approach. Instead of trying to find something different about the subject, I concentrated on mark-making, on the way I put the drawing down on the paper. That took my attention away from what I was drawing and onto how I was drawing and in a roundabout way the subject emerged more or less on its own. The mark making took in the lengthy shadows on the beach cast by an evening summer sun, the pier, the smoke from the Port Talbot chimneys in the distance, the tiny figures strolling near the water’s edge.

 

I’m currently working on a series of expressive drawings of ancestral sites and if you want to see some of my other artworks, please click here.

Up The Mynydd

29 Jun

20140629_204450(1)

Husb and I went up Mynydd Betws (Betws Mountain) today to get our regular supply of farmyard manure for the allotment. We had young nephew with us so we stopped a while to look at the gorgeous view and the sheep and lambs. There are a lot of black faced sheep up there.

I had a quick scribble into my little A6 spotty sketchbook with a Faber Castell Pitt drawing pen size S. The landscape is so enormous it’s hard to know where to start and how to approach it, but the main thing is to focus on making marks and not try to get in too much detail. I think of van Gogh’s landscape drawings when I’m doing them.

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