Archive | videos RSS feed for this section

Spit And Splatter

15 Sep

mad mari 1

Carrying on with the coffee lift plate I worked on at Trefeglwys Print Studio last weekend, after washing the coffee off the plate, leaving the black B.I.G. etching ground masking most of the aluminium, I dipped it in copper sulphate solution for quite some time to etch the exposed areas really deep so they’ll give a good strong black when printed. Then when I was happy with the amount etched, the B.I.G. ground was cleaned off with non-toxic paint stripper.

 

mad mari 2

Then I started to etch the rest of the plate using a spit bite technique, brushing and splashing and splattering copper sulphate solution onto the aluminium. You have to keep rinsing the plate because the copper sulphate leaves a dark ‘rust’ on the plate as it etches and this will eventually build up and stop the etching process. You can see it above – the darker areas to the left of the Mari Lwyd’s face. After the very precise and tight process of the mezzotint plate I also did at the workshop, I wanted to be much freer and looser with this one.

Tomorrow …. finishing the spit bite etch and printing the plate …..

And here’s one of Andrew Baldwin’s videos demonstrating coffee lift and spit bite

 

Now The Printmakers

23 Aug
banner

From left to right: Andrew Baldwin, Rose Davies, John Abell

 

Opening Friday 21st September from 17.30 to 20.00 and continuing 10.30 – 4.30 September 22nd to 29th EXCEPT Monday 24th.

Swansea Print Workshop, a hidden gem, is exhibiting original prints as part of “Nawr Yr Arwr / Now The Hero“, inspired by World War 1 artists Frank Brangwyn and Käthe Kollwitz with work by artist members alongside three featured Welsh printmakers:

John Abell (Cardiff), woodcuts from “The Diary of a Dead Officer” published by Old Stile Press

Andrew Baldwin (Trefeglwys, Powys), etchings and mezzotints inspired by the World War 1 battlefield

And me! Rose Davies / Rosie Scribblah (Swansea), monotypes and etchings from “The Warrior”, a series from my 10 year working relationship with Captain David Williams, a serving soldier and life model, who also features in Nawr yr Arwr.

 

Here’s a short video of me and my model working on a new monotype for “Nawr Yr Arwr / Now The Hero”

 

Frank Brangwyn and Käthe Kollwitz were accomplished multidisciplinary artists, both lived and worked through World War 1, and both excelled in the medium of printmaking. Drawing inspiration from the wealth of print media in which they worked, including etching, woodcut and lithography, Swansea Print Workshop’s exhibition will respond to the rich visual wealth of the sumptuous Brangwyn panels and the recent Glynn Vivian Art Gallery exhibition of Käthe Kollwitz prints.

 

I Cried

17 Aug
SONY DSC

My monotype based on an original life drawing of my model, a young Welsh soldier

Swansea, September 21st to 29th 2018.

I’ve been involved in the expansive art project Nawr Yr Arwr / Now The Hero for some time and it’s all coming to a head in Swansea at the end of September. It’s part of a whole load of specially commissioned art projects from “14-18 NOW WW1 Centenary Art Commissions“, a nationwide programme of innovative and thought-provoking art events that commemorate – not celebrate- World War One.

Some of the highlights for me have been Cummins and Piper’s amazing gigantic installation of “Weeping Poppies” -I saw it at the Tower of London- and Jeremy Deller’s “We’re Here Because We’re Here“, commemorating those who died in the Battle of the Somme. I stopped in my tracks in the centre of Swansea as a group of VERY young men in WW1 uniform walked silently by. I cried. My grandfather was just 14 years old when he enlisted. He lied about his age.

Were-Here-Because-Credit-Eoin-Carey_01-Glasgow

Image credit: ‘we’re here because we’re here’ conceived and created by Jeremy Deller in collaboration with Rufus Norris, photo by Eoin Carey

I have been working with a life model, a young soldier, for 10 years and our working relationship – and the work I have produced – are a part of Nawr Yr Arwr / Now The Hero. You can see a short film of us below. As well as the film, many of the drawings and original prints I have made over the last decade will be exhibited at Swansea Print Workshop and Volcano – I’ll write a bit more about this over the next couple of weeks.

“Nawr Yr Awr \ Now The Hero is an immersive theatrical experience that will take the audience on an extraordinary journey through three intertwining narratives of war; from Celtic history, the First World War, and today’s conflicts. Drawing on an epic poem, some rejected paintings, and an intimate portrait of a Swansea soldier serving today,  Marc Rees’ bold production brings the stories of war to life, but counterpoints the tragic telling with hope.”

nya

Inspired By Frank

15 Jun

Coming up in August – I’m running a weekend printmaking workshop inspired by Frank Brangwyn , one of my artistic heroes. An outstanding draughtsman, painter, printmaker, muralist who exhibited with the Viennese Secession but unlike Klimt and Schiele, Frank had the mis/fortune to live to a ripe old age and fall out of fashion; he’s due for a reappraisal and revival.

nya course flyer

I am involved in a large immersive arts project that’s climaxing in September called Nawr yr Arwr / Now the Hero, the brainchild of artist Marc Rees, which is centred around the magnificent Brangwyn Hall in Swansea, which houses the beautiful Brangwyn panels. As part of the lead up to the final act, I’ll be running a two day print course at Swansea Print Workshop, inspired by Frank’s panels and the remembrance of World War 1 (he was a war artist too).

Brangwyn-13

One of Brangwyn’s magnificent paintings

 

Here’s a short film about me, my model, my monotype and Nawr Yr Arwr / Now The Hero

And if you want to see more about the monotype technique I use, please visit the Techie section of my website, here.

Suffering For My Art!

11 Jun
workers 1

Me and my unruly hair talking about my work on ancient standing stones.

 

I had a fab evening out last week, up The Workers, a lovely gallery in the village of Ynyshir in the Rhondda Valley. On the first Thursday of each month, they host an evening of Words, Arts and Music (WAM) and I was part of it this month. I did a talk about my work, mainly the en plein air pieces I did in collaboration with prehistorian Dewi Bowen, who’s been researching his new book, and filmmaker Melvyn Williams.

 

event-header

Some of the mixed media drawings in my series ‘Yr Helfa’.

 

Dewi did an illustrated talk about ancient monuments in the area around Rhondda and Melvyn premiered the new film he’s made of me and Dewi on our creative journey across South Wales. Here’s the film below. People in the audience seemed to find it funny, especially the bits of me suffering for my art!!!

 

W!A!M! At The Workers

31 May

WAM night June 2018

Coming up fast – Thursday June 7th at The Workers Gallery, Ynyshir from 7pm. There will be art (from me), film (from Melvyn Williams), prehistory (from Dewi Bowen), cake, chocolates (from Afan Vale) and there may even be music. All free. How can you miss this? If you haven’t visited this little gem of a gallery before, then make this your first time. It’s run by artists for artists and it’s just awesome and it’s Trip Advisor’s number 1 attraction in the Rhondda Valley and yet receives NO public funding. So please come and support it. The W!A!M! evenings are on the first Thursday of every month and are brilliant. Seriously. And I’m not just saying that because I’m in the next one. Honest 😉

Here’s a tiny preview of what to expect from Melvyn’s film ….

 

Nooks And Crannies

10 Apr

red c

This morning I carried on with my detour into randomness, overprinting yesterday’s yellow lino cuts with red (Caligo Easy Wipe in Process Magenta mixed 70:30 with Extender).

Because I had a moment of madness and ripped the paper with my bare hands instead of using a nice steel straight edge it was a bit awkward to take the prints with a Japanese baren, especially around the rough edges, so I used a smooth marble egg to get into the nooks and crannies.

red d

I saw marble eggs and spheres being used for hand printing when I did a residency in Pakistan a few years back, where there is a traditional marble carving industry. It works really well for small areas. The eggs are quite expensive so I’ve gotten into the habit of buying them from charity shops and car boot sales.

 

So Many Creatives

18 Mar

Kat Ridgeway

 

The exhibition to celebrate International Women’s Day at Swansea’s Cinema & Co is coming to an end, just one more day. It’s been a privilege to work with such an amazing group of creative people. Here’s most of the wall-based art in the show – I didn’t manage to photograph a couple of the pieces. There were also films and entrepreneurs at the opening event, a real celebration of women’s achievements.

 

 

Artists, designers, performers and filmmakers are Aida Garton, Ally Jay Phillips, Alyson Williams, Amber Hiscott, Amelia Thomas (Unity), Amy Goldring, Angie Stevens, Ann Jordan, Ann Lucas, Avant Cymru, Carol Lawrence, Catrin Jones, Chris Bird-Jones, Claudia Mollzahn, Emma Cownie, Hana Scoular, Kara Seaman, Kat Ridgeway, Kate Bell, Laura Niehorster, Leila Bebb, Leanne Vaughan Phillips, Lynne Bebb, Nazma Botanica, Natie M Davies, Nicky Stitch, Patricia McKenna Jones, Rose Davies (Rosie Scribblah), Rhona Tooze, Rufus Mufasa, Sally Davies, Sally Price, Tina Wisby. Plus entrepreneurs Anna Redfern and Goggi Shazi.

Thank you, you are amazing women.

Here’s one of the films, featuring artwork by Aida Garton.

Mother And Daughter

17 Mar

Lynne B

I organised an exhibition and event for International Women’s Day last week at Swansea’s Cinema & Co, showcasing women artists, makers and entrepreneurs from the Swansea area. Mother and daughter Lynne and Leila Bebb are featured. Lynne Bebb is a sculptor and printmaker and has exhibited a trio of screenprinted monotypes with her daughter Leila as the subject. Leila is a performance artist and we showed this film of her contemporary dance piece, “Shattering“. So much talent in one family.

Shattering from Lynne Bebb on Vimeo.

 

The film was choreographed by Jessie Brett with original music by Jered Sorkin and supported by The Welfare, Ystradgynlais.

 

The Airhead In A Spotted Knitted Coat

3 Feb

knitted coat

So when I go to a gig, I go to listen and enjoy and maybe have a bit of a dance (although a lot of people don’t think that headbanging is dancing) and I assume that other people are there for the same reason, so it really narks me when you get some airhead who thinks it’s okay to stand near the stage and talk, loudly and incessantly, through the set. It happened the other week when I was in Cardiff for the launch of Rufus Mufasa’s album , “Fur Coats From The Lion’s Den” and this airhead stood right in front of me and gabbled her way through a load of performances. Which isn’t just annoying but also really disrespectful to the performers who had put so much effort into their acts. Why couldn’t she go to the back? Or go to the toilets? Or just go? I thought about whacking her with my sketchbook but then I’D be the bad guy. I wasn’t going to draw her because that would be giving her some credibility so here’s an empty page dedicated to the empty airhead in the spotted knitted coat.

Please do check out Rufus Mufasa’s music on the video, she’s brilliant.

%d bloggers like this: