Tag Archives: Dewi Bowen

The Sticky One

15 Aug

Here are some more sketches I did at Rosehill Quarry yesterday during the labyrinth refurbishment. I had some of my home-made walnut ink with me but no nib pens, so I rooted around on the ground for a bit of stick and used that instead. I should do it more often because it’s very freeing. I can’t get much control over it so the drawings are more expressive.

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left and to see the complete image.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

Cockling The Labyrinth

14 Aug

Back in 1987, the Rosehill Quarry Project was turning an overgrown disused quarry on the outskirts of Swansea’s city centre into a nature reserve and community park. One of the things that was built there was a Cretan labyrinth. It was cut into the turf, revealing the red ash surface of the old tennis courts and filled with cockle shells, a by-product of the local shellfish industry in nearby Penclawdd. Every summer local people and labyrinth enthusiasts meet up to recut the edges of the labyrinth’s path and lay down new cockle shells. The drawing shows a stylised sketch of the labyrinth with Dewi Bowen sitting on a seat looking on. I drew with conte crayons onto paper that I had prepared with my home made walnut ink.

The labyrinth was conceived and built by Bob Shaw and Dewi Bowen; Dewi came along today, 34 years after its creation, to talk to us about how it all happened. It’s great that so many people turned up to cut back the overgrowth around the labyrinth’s edge and to get stuck into “cockling” the paths, especially as we couldn’t do it last year because of the Covid19 lockdown. I found a quiet space perched above the action to draw from.

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left and to see the complete image.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

Cockle Shells And A Labyrinth

15 Aug

labyrinth

Thirty one years ago I was working on a local environmental programme, The Rosehill Quarry Project, a community-led scheme to clear and renovate an old quarry near the city centre and turn it into a nature reserve and leisure area for local people. One of the things we did was to work with Welsh prehistorian, Dewi Bowen, to cut a Cretan labyrinth into the turf and line it with cockle shells, a local resource from the Gower Peninsula cockle industry. Over the years, people have gathered to maintain the labyrinth and there was a work group just a week or so ago.

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The labyrinth after last week’s renovation. Photograph by Martin Slucutt.

 

I did the drawing above onto newspaper with pastels, charcoal and chalk, from the first viewing point on the path up to Pantycelyn Road.

 

 

Suffering For My Art!

11 Jun

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Me and my unruly hair talking about my work on ancient standing stones.

 

I had a fab evening out last week, up The Workers, a lovely gallery in the village of Ynyshir in the Rhondda Valley. On the first Thursday of each month, they host an evening of Words, Arts and Music (WAM) and I was part of it this month. I did a talk about my work, mainly the en plein air pieces I did in collaboration with prehistorian Dewi Bowen, who’s been researching his new book, and filmmaker Melvyn Williams.

 

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Some of the mixed media drawings in my series ‘Yr Helfa’.

 

Dewi did an illustrated talk about ancient monuments in the area around Rhondda and Melvyn premiered the new film he’s made of me and Dewi on our creative journey across South Wales. Here’s the film below. People in the audience seemed to find it funny, especially the bits of me suffering for my art!!!

 

A Snippet

30 Jul

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I posted a tiny bit of some work I started yesterday and today I took it a stage further. Here’s a little snippet of it but it’s secret at the moment so I can’t say anymore.

 

Meanwhile, tomorrow …….

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Sshhh!!!!

29 Jul

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I’ve been working flat out on something secret. That’s all I can say but I’ll let you see a tiny snippet of one of my working drawings. This work won’t come to fruition for another year or so and I’m so excited about it. Watch this space…….

 

But in the meanwhile, coming up very fast …..

 

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Two Birds With One Stone

28 Jul

Number 94

 

I managed to kill two birds with one stone this evening, simultaneously doing a sketch for tonight’s blog and reaching Number 94 out of my target of drawing 100 Baby Boomers. Husb and I went to Swansea Storytelling Club and I scribbled while listening to artist and performer David Pitt. David and I have been trying to find time for me to draw him for the Boomers series for ages and it happened quite by accident. Result!

 

And edging nearer by the minute – next Monday …….

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Mahoosive Manhole

27 Jul

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Some manholes are much bigger than others, big enough to get a man down a hole. Here’s one printed by The Plebeian Printmakers the other weekend at the Gwyl Troublemakers Festival. You can get an idea of it’s size by looking at my ridiculous Bagpuss slippers at the bottom.

 

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And coming soon to Cinema & Co…….

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Medieval Manhole

26 Jul

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Some manholes are not manholes at all. They’re too small to get a man down. While I was doing some public printmaking with The Plebeian Printmakers a couple of weekends ago, we saw all sorts of manhole covers, big and small and this lovely one was one of the smallest.

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We were puzzled by it because it has that number 8 on it and there was no keyhole so it didn’t give access to anything underground. My fellow Plebeian Printmakers, Lynne Bebb and Hannah Lawson found a similar one with the number 16 a bit further down Swansea’s High Street.

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They did some investigating later on and found that there are lots more in the area, seventeen in all, marking out a virtual tour of Medieval Swansea – you can find it here. 

 

 

 

 

And rushing up faster than I would like ….. because I have to get stuff ready for it …. ERK!!!!!! Please come if you can 😀

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Mediocre Manhole

25 Jul

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Manholes can be quite fancy but some are no-frills and this is one of them. But I like the typography. It’s done in metal. That’s the British Kite Mark on the bottom. I used a blue non-toxic water-based printing ink by Seawhites of Brighton, very economical.

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No time to rest ….. this is coming up in a few days …..

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