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Masked Life Drawing

17 Sep

fat dave 1

Just back from life drawing at Swansea Print Workshop – first time I’ve been in ages, even before lockdown I hadn’t been in a while. I’m really tired so more tomorrow. Na night, nos da 🙂

 

 

Marbling With The Surrealists

8 Sep

marbled paper small 4

 

This is a bit of experimentation I did, marbling some paper with black oil paint floated onto a bowl of water. I dipped a sheet of paper onto the surface of the paint and lifted it off and dried it. Then I used my imagination to see and draw shapes with compressed charcoal – a vaguely human image emerged. This spontaneous and imaginative approach was used extensively by the Surrealists in the early 20th century, as a way to loosen up creatively.

 

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

 

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

In this one, I combine some of the images with snippets of text of things my Nana used to say. She used to take me to Swansea Museum a lot when I was little and I could hear her voice in the back of my head as I was sitting and drawing the birds and bugs.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

 

 

Looking Back (With A Kitten)

3 Sep

SONY DSC

Oh the glamour of being an artist. Sorting through my drawers. I decided to spend a bit of time this evening organising my plans chest, which meant rediscovering some of my older work. It was good, remembering how I’d done things a while back. This mixed media piece started as a drawing with a life model – my cat Sparta Puss, who was a kitten at the time, ran in playing with a ball of rolled up paper. I was going through a phase of preparing large sheets of beautiful paper – Bockingford, Somerset, BFK Rives, with random squeegeeing (a bit like Gerhard Richter) and screen prints to build up layers of background textures. Then I collaged and drew on top. The blanket that the model is lying on is made up of a ripped up linocut print that I ended up not liking. I painted all the little fragments with oil glazes before I stuck them down. Waste not, want not.

 

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

In this one, I combined the image of the bird with snippets of text of things my Nana used to say. She used to take me to Swansea Museum a lot when I was small and I could hear her voice in the back of my head as I was sitting and drawing the birds and bugs.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

 

Life Drawing Live

12 May

BBC life drawing

I checked into the live life drawing session on BBC4 this evening and did this 5 minute sketch. I couldn’t stay for the full programme, it’s family Zoom quiz night, but I’ll catch up with it later in the week and draw the rest of the models. There’s a lot of art happening on the TV during lockdown, it’s great. The model is copying the pose of Velazquez’ Rokeby Venus. I used a solid graphite block onto some vintage Fabriano paper.

Turning Over A New Page….

19 Jun

sheep skull 2

I do quite a bit of teaching, to adults, and many have a big problem with drawing, they feel that they can’t draw and that when they try, they get very demoralised because “it isn’t perfect”. So many people have unrealistic expectations about drawing and don’t realise that, like any skill, it takes commitment, practice and dedication. They also don’t realise that even professional artists don’t get perfection every time we put pen to paper, or even most of the time. I started drawing from a sheep skull earlier today and the first one (below) was a bit rubbish. But instead of giving up, I turned over a new page and started again, scribbling away with a ballpoint pen and producing something I’m happier with.

Sheep skull 1

 

 

 

 

 

Variations On A Theme

11 May

male back drawing colour

There’s often a temptation to keep doing something new, to keep chasing novelty, when you’re an artist. But really there’s nothing wrong with returning to the same subject or even the same drawing again and again to explore different ways of developing it.

male back drawing large

I started this series with a very small ink drawing (bottom), then did a much larger drawing in graphite and finally a mixed-media piece in acrylic, graphite and oil-bars.

male back drawing

Angles

3 May

Chrissy 2

Here’s another aspect of last evening’s life drawing session, using conté crayons to analyse the angles of her face.

Back To Basics

2 May

Chrissy 1

I returned to life drawing group tonight, after a long break. Too long. It was great to get my mojo back!

Flowing

9 Apr

Chris 6

 

Thinking and planning what to work on next. I want to develop a series of large woodcuts working with a retired female soldier and life model, so I’m looking back through my sketchbooks at the work I have already with her done over the past three years to get the creative juices flowing. I like working with older models, particularly women because we’re so often ‘disappeared’ in our youth-obsessed society.

 

Easy Peasy Quick Ink

31 Mar

prep 4

I often print small blocks at home as I can do them by hand and don’t need to use the fabulous Columbian press at Swansea Print Workshop. This is how I set up a little inking station without fuss or mess.

Stick some newspaper onto your work surface with a bit of masking tape.

Stick a piece of ordinary white paper down onto it, with masking tape. I used a sheet of A4 size white computer printout paper.

Stick a sheet of thin but sturdy PVC / plastic / acetate over it with some masking tape. I used acetate document covers you get with comb binding machines.

There it is. Easy Peasy.

 

 

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