Tag Archives: Swansea

From The Top

19 Jan

Another little quickie sketch from my walks around Waun Wen in Swansea. This is from the last street before the next area starts and I’m standing (in the freezing cold) at the top of some very, very steep steps looking over to the other side of Waun Wen. The area is built on two hills on either side of a valley. I guess that years ago the River Burlais might have run down the valley (it’s underground now), but these days the area is cut through by a dual carriageway, a rotten bit of town planning in my opinion. But that’s what you get when petrol heads are put in charge of these things. Never mind, it’s still lovely.

Part of the Home and Hinterland community arts project in partnership with Swansea University’s Taliesin Arts Centre.

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the antique taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these vintage artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

Shadows On The Steps

17 Jan

Here’s another little sketch from my regular Sunday walks around the Waun Wen area of the city. There’s a lovely little set of old stone steps at the end of a picturesque terrace, unfortunately sometimes used by miscreants. We stopped for a while and I had a scribble. The bright, low winter sunshine stretched our shadows.

Part of the Home and Hinterland community arts project in partnership with Swansea University’s Taliesin Arts Centre

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the antique taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these vintage artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

Blue Prints In The Park

16 Jan

I spent a happy afternoon in Waun Wen today, making sunprints (cyanotypes) with plants in the park. Thanks to the lovely people who came along and joined in. The weather was grim earlier but the sun came out just as we started. The blue colour on the prints will deepen over a couple of days. This is the earliest form of photography and was invented in 1842 by the Astronomer Royal, John Herschel and the technique was used to produce the very first photography book by the botanist Anna Atkins in 1843.

Part of the Home and Hinterland community arts project in partnership with Swansea University’s Taliesin Arts Centre.

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the antique taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these vintage artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

The Woodland Walk

15 Jan

Walking around the Waun Wen area of the city with my little sketchbook, I’ve found a few places I didn’t know before, even though I’ve known this area all my life. At the top of the new-ish Cwmfelin housing estate, on the site of the old tin-plate works, is a pleasant woodland walk, quiet, with fabulous views and, despite being so close to the city, a main road and a railway line, the sound of birdsong was overwhelming. Lovely.

Part of the Home and Hinterland community arts project in partnership with Swansea University’s Taliesin Arts Centre

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the antique taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these vintage artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

Street Metal!

14 Jan

I love street metal. I’ve really got a thing about manhole, stopcock and drain covers. I walk around the streets looking down and cooing when I spot a particularly fine example. People look at me funny. They’re fascinating – they’re portals to a world of water buried beneath our feet. Here are some from Waun Wen. I was there this morning, it was very cold, and I did some graphite rubbings onto Hosho paper. I took a rubbing of some pavement as well, very nice texture too.

I’m working in the Waun Wen area of the city until the end of February, part of the Home and Hinterland community arts project in partnership with Swansea University’s Taliesin Arts Centre.

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the antique taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these vintage artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

Wonkiness On The Street

13 Jan

Last Sunday was my ninth walk through the Waun Wen area of the city, sketching as I go. I spend an hour just focussing on what I see and sketching. Sometimes the scribbles are just a few minutes, sometimes a view needs longer to be looked at and analysed before I start to draw. This took a while because the wonky lightpost just didn’t look right – but it doesn’t look right in real life anyway because it’s wonky! I don’t know what happened to make it so wonky. It seems to be pretty solid. That series of curves behind it were a bit of a challenge too, to get them in proportion.

Walk Waun Wen, Talk Waun Wen is part of the Home and Hinterland art project in partnership with Swansea University’s Taliesin Arts Centre.

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the antique taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these vintage artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

What’s In A Name? Ghosts Of The Past.

12 Jan

What’s in a name? That’s the beginning of a quote by William Shakespeare. It’s a question I’ve thought a lot about in recent weeks as I’ve been working on a community arts project in the Waun Wen area of the city. It’s an area that’s gone through a lot of changes over the past 3 centuries and at the moment it’s a 21st century cityscape, with Victorian terraces scrambling up the hills, punctuated by modern social housing estates and areas of unspoilt greenery, bisected by a large busy dual carriageway.

Buried beneath is an Industrial Revolution townscape, poisoned ground – the remains of metal works and spoil tips – a quarry and many culverted and diverted underground waterways.

And under that, a pre-industrial bucolic landscape of rolling hills, streams and brooks, meadows and mills. Very little of that remains, except in the place names, which echo as ghosts of the past in people’s everyday speech. I’ve found that many of the local residents hadn’t realised that these reflect the area’s buried history. The names are in the image above, they’re beautiful in both languages. Some are very specific, for instance “Caepistyll – The Field with a Spouted Waterfall”, but I’m not sure what exactly a spouted waterfall is. I was told it’s a waterfall that seems to flow upwards in certain conditions, but that sounds odd to me. Any geographers out there?

As I walk around following these place names, I imagine what it must have looked like before the brutality of the Industrial Revolution and 20th century urban sprawl.

Walk Waun Wen, Talk Waun Wen is part of the Home and Hinterland art project in partnership with Swansea University’s Taliesin Arts Centre.

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the antique taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these vintage artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

The Tech Genius And Art In The Wet

10 Jan

I’ve just changed the home page of my website for the next couple of months to show what I’m doing with the Home and Hinterland community arts project in Waun Wen, which is funded by Swansea University’s Taliesin Arts Centre. I’ve done more than 30 blog posts about it so far, and my tech genius (Husb) has pulled it all together in one place – I was surprised how much is there already and there’s another two months (nearly) to go, where I’ll be doing loads more arty stuff. If the Covid stays away. And the rain. Never mind, I can do art in the wet 😀

So please click on the big SCRIBBLAH at the top to check it out and when you’re there, click on the first picture and you’ll be able to see all the little drawing blog posts. I’m loving being there, it’s a gorgeous area, the people are lovely and the views are lush.

This work is part of the Home and Hinterland project funded by Swansea University’s Taliesin Arts Centre.

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the antique taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these vintage artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

The White Meadow. Waun Wen

15 Nov

Here are a couple more sketches I did on one of my recent quiet contemplative walks around the Waun Wen area of Swansea. It’s a traditional working class area near the centre of Swansea. Local place names reflect its pre-industrial bucolic heritage – Ysgubor Fach (Little Barn), Cwmfelin and Brynmelin (valley with a mill, hill with a mill), Pentre Hafod (Village of the Summer Pasture), while Waun Wen itself means White Meadow. Unfortunately, this idyll didn’t survive the Industrial Revolution and when I was growing up on the outskirts of the area, Cwmfelin was an inner city steelworks and Pentre Hafod the biggest slag tip in Europe, both covering the washing on lines for miles around with black dust. They were eventually cleared (after the tragedy of Aberfan pricked the conscience of the government) and the sites have been used for social housing and a comprehensive school respectively.

My lovely nephew (in the middle) along with these other wonderful young people have benefitted from the Children In Need charity and now they’re giving something back. They’re the Surprise Squad (more about them here) and you can follow their adventures on BBC1s “The One Show“, every evening until 18th November. I know that times are hard, but if you can spare a quid or two, please consider donating to Children In Need (here). They really do make a difference to young lives. Thank you xxx

Walking The Streets

13 Nov

Here’s another little sketch I did, walking the streets last week. I’m doing a sort of drawing contemplation I guess. Sketching what’s in front of me fixes it in my mind much more thoroughly than taking a photo ever would. I’m building up a bigger picture of the area now from these little pictures. Plenty more to do though.

My lovely nephew (in the middle) along with these other wonderful young people have benefitted from the Children In Need charity and now they’re giving something back. They’re the Surprise Squad (more about them here) and you can follow their adventures on BBC1s “The One Show“, every evening until 18th November. I know that times are hard, but if you can spare a quid or two, please consider donating to Children In Need (here). They really do make a difference to young lives. Thank you xxx

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