Tag Archives: sketchbooks

Drawing The Bronze Age Mines

18 Nov

indusrtial

I did this sketch a few days ago while Husb and I were driving back from Devil’s Bridge, via the mountain road to Rhayader. We stopped for a while at these old mines going back to the Bronze Age, near Cwmystwyth. The earliest miners about 4,000 years ago extracted copper, but from Roman times the hills have been mined for lead.

industrial 2

I drew quickly into my A3 spiral bound brown paper sketchbook from Seawhites of Brighton, with conté crayons in white, sanguine and black. The weather was terrible, cold, wet and blowing a gale so I stayed in the car. There’s only so much suffering I’m going to do for my art lol 😀

 

 

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left and to see the complete image.

Inspired by drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artefacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

Barcud: Red Kite: Milvus Milvus

17 Nov

kites 1

Husb and I went to Ceredigion for an overnighter, just to get out of the city. We haven’t escaped the area since lockdown started in March so it was a relief to get away, even for such a short time. We called in to the Red Kite Feeding Centre, near Rhayader. Barcud is the Welsh word for red kite, milvus milvus in Latin. They’re amazing birds. We hired a hide because it was raining and I wanted to draw and Husb wanted to film.

kites 2

It wasn’t easy drawing so many moving creatures – they’re really fast! And there were hundreds of them. They’re beautiful and it’s great to see so many; not so long ago they were almost extinct in Wales. I drew quickly, just aiming to get impressions of their flight rather than details. I used white and sanguine conté crayons with a touch of black into a brown paper sketchbook. Here’s a short video of these lovelies in flight.

 

 

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left and to see the complete image.

Inspired by drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artefacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

A Trip To Hinterland

16 Nov

Chasm draw

We’ve been in lockdown for what seems like forever so Husb booked us an evening away at the Hafod Hotel at Devil’s Bridge – Pont ar Fynach – in Ceredigion, for a bit of a break. It’s a very atmospheric part of the world and features a lot in the Cymru Noir crime drama TV series “Hinterland“.

Chasm view

Dusk was already drawing in on a gloomy afternoon when we checked in and we had a lovely room with a spectacular view along the chasm  – the Devil’s Bridge is at the bottom of it. I grabbed some conté crayons and scribbled the view quickly into my brown paper sketchbook before it became too dark.

spooky house

The lovely but spooky Hafod Hotel, right above the Devil’s Bridge.

 

 

 

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left and to see the complete image.

Inspired by drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artefacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

Caturday’s Scribble

7 Nov

pandemic scribble 1

Had a busy day today, doing some essential shopping for a relative and getting my one hour government sanctioned lockdown brisk walk and now I just want to slob out on the settee watching mindless telly with Sparta Puss at my side. But I didn’t do any art! So I grabbed a new sketchbook (Daler Rowney A4 95gsm acid free) and some conté crayons in black, white and sanguine and scribbled the cat, without having to move from the settee. Then I took a photo with the camera on my Smartphone (there’s magic) and uploaded it to my laptop (or is that downloaded), did a bit of cropping and resizing on Photoshop (ooh get me) and here she is. Simples.

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left and to see the complete image.

Inspired by drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artefacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

 

Let’s See Where It Takes Me …..

7 Oct

scrapbook

I’m a bit old school when it comes to sketchbooks, I take the term literally and I sketch in them. But one of my lockdown challenges is to try working differently, to get out of my comfort zone, so I’ve been rethinking how to use a sketchbook. I had a few A3 brown paper sketchbooks knocking around that I haven’t used because the paper is poor quality. And I am one of the decreasing numbers of people who still buys a newspaper (the ‘i’) so I thought I’d start cutting interesting images and pieces of text out of the papers and stick them into the sketchbook, as reference / source materials. I’m not sure where it’s going to lead, I haven’t done this before, but it’s already generating some ideas. Let’s see ……..

 

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left and to see the complete image.

In this one, I combined snippets of a bird and discarded plastic with the image of a bug, part of the Museum’s fascinating vintage collection.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

 

Finishing A Sketchbook

29 Sep

1cefnbrynbrain

A few weeks into the pandemic lockdown, when it became obvious that it was going to last a long while, I set myself some lockdown challenges. One is to improve my painting skills, which I’ve been doing with the Friday Cheese and Wine Painting Club on Facebook, practising faking well known paintings. Another is to do Tai Chi every day, which I’ve pretty much managed. A third is to have cold showers – my family have all got into Wim Hof so I’m giving it a try – it’s hell! And I also wanted to practise charcoal drawing, something I’ve avoided for years because I didn’t like the messiness. A friend gave me a lovely Khadi sketchbook for Xmas, the paper is heavy and rough and it really suits my Daler Rowney willow charcoal.

Husb and I took a drive to the Brecon Beacons on Saturday and stopped the car to look at the magnificent view and I made the last drawing in my book – number 30. The day was brilliantly sunny but also very cold and windy, so the sketch was quick and, well, sketchy. My shadow looms darkly in the bottom left of the scene.

Here’s a short video showing what it’s like drawing at the top of a mountain.

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Working in wild windy Wales.

A post shared by Rose Davies (@rosiescribblah) on

 

 

 

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

In this one, I combined the image of the bird with snippets of text of things my Nana used to say. She used to take me to Swansea Museum a lot when I was small and I could hear her voice in the back of my head as I was sitting and drawing the birds and bugs.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

 

Life drawing tonight

24 Sep

Chrissy 1

Just back from life drawing at Swansea Print Workshop. Nice to be back in the saddle. Great model, lovely to work with her again. I’m tired now, so more of this tomorrow. Nos da, good night 😀

Back In The Saddle

21 Sep

fat dave 5

Here’s another drawing from last week’s Life Drawing class at Swansea Print Workshop. It was so good to get back in the saddle, as it were. I used Daler Rowney medium sized sticks of willow charcoal onto vintage W. M. Saunders paper. It’s a joy to use quality materials.

 

 

 

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

In this one, I combined the image of the bird with snippets of text of things my Nana used to say. She used to take me to Swansea Museum a lot when I was small and I could hear her voice in the back of my head as I was sitting and drawing the birds and bugs.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

 

Male Model And Paper Mills

20 Sep

fat dave 2

Here’s a completed piece in charcoal I did at last Thursday’s life drawing group at Swansea Print Workshop. It was the first session since lockdown began in March and it was so good to be back. Because of the current restrictions, we were only able to have 5 drawers plus the model and it was fully booked straight away. I managed to get a place at the last minute after someone pulled out. It’s so much better than drawing from the televised and Zoom sessions that have been available. They’re ok, but there’s something missing. Our model has grown an enormous lockdown beard since we last saw him so drawing that as well as a mask was new!

fat dave 1

It also gave me a chance to use some lovely vintage paper from the W. H. Saunders mill, which no longer exists. It’s a shame that so many paper mills have been lost in the UK, there used to be loads but now there are just a few left in the English county of Somerset. St. Cuthbert’s Mill, dating from the 1700s, makes a lot of the traditional papers we use at Swansea Print Workshop and there’s another, more recent one, the Two Rivers Mill, that I’m keen to try out. And there’s a small mill at Wookey Hole, which has been operating since at least 1610, and currently uses Victorian machinery. I think I’ll have to do a road trip to Somerset and trek around the paper mills. That’s my idea of a good time. I’m such a geek.

 

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

In this one, I combined the image of the bird with snippets of text of things my Nana used to say. She used to take me to Swansea Museum a lot when I was small and I could hear her voice in the back of my head as I was sitting and drawing the birds and bugs.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

 

Masked Life Drawing

17 Sep

fat dave 1

Just back from life drawing at Swansea Print Workshop – first time I’ve been in ages, even before lockdown I hadn’t been in a while. I’m really tired so more tomorrow. Na night, nos da 🙂

 

 

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