Archive by Author

Blue Prints In The Park

16 Jan

I spent a happy afternoon in Waun Wen today, making sunprints (cyanotypes) with plants in the park. Thanks to the lovely people who came along and joined in. The weather was grim earlier but the sun came out just as we started. The blue colour on the prints will deepen over a couple of days. This is the earliest form of photography and was invented in 1842 by the Astronomer Royal, John Herschel and the technique was used to produce the very first photography book by the botanist Anna Atkins in 1843.

Part of the Home and Hinterland community arts project in partnership with Swansea University’s Taliesin Arts Centre.

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the antique taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these vintage artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

The Woodland Walk

15 Jan

Walking around the Waun Wen area of the city with my little sketchbook, I’ve found a few places I didn’t know before, even though I’ve known this area all my life. At the top of the new-ish Cwmfelin housing estate, on the site of the old tin-plate works, is a pleasant woodland walk, quiet, with fabulous views and, despite being so close to the city, a main road and a railway line, the sound of birdsong was overwhelming. Lovely.

Part of the Home and Hinterland community arts project in partnership with Swansea University’s Taliesin Arts Centre

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the antique taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these vintage artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

Street Metal!

14 Jan

I love street metal. I’ve really got a thing about manhole, stopcock and drain covers. I walk around the streets looking down and cooing when I spot a particularly fine example. People look at me funny. They’re fascinating – they’re portals to a world of water buried beneath our feet. Here are some from Waun Wen. I was there this morning, it was very cold, and I did some graphite rubbings onto Hosho paper. I took a rubbing of some pavement as well, very nice texture too.

I’m working in the Waun Wen area of the city until the end of February, part of the Home and Hinterland community arts project in partnership with Swansea University’s Taliesin Arts Centre.

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the antique taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these vintage artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

Wonkiness On The Street

13 Jan

Last Sunday was my ninth walk through the Waun Wen area of the city, sketching as I go. I spend an hour just focussing on what I see and sketching. Sometimes the scribbles are just a few minutes, sometimes a view needs longer to be looked at and analysed before I start to draw. This took a while because the wonky lightpost just didn’t look right – but it doesn’t look right in real life anyway because it’s wonky! I don’t know what happened to make it so wonky. It seems to be pretty solid. That series of curves behind it were a bit of a challenge too, to get them in proportion.

Walk Waun Wen, Talk Waun Wen is part of the Home and Hinterland art project in partnership with Swansea University’s Taliesin Arts Centre.

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the antique taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these vintage artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

What’s In A Name? Ghosts Of The Past.

12 Jan

What’s in a name? That’s the beginning of a quote by William Shakespeare. It’s a question I’ve thought a lot about in recent weeks as I’ve been working on a community arts project in the Waun Wen area of the city. It’s an area that’s gone through a lot of changes over the past 3 centuries and at the moment it’s a 21st century cityscape, with Victorian terraces scrambling up the hills, punctuated by modern social housing estates and areas of unspoilt greenery, bisected by a large busy dual carriageway.

Buried beneath is an Industrial Revolution townscape, poisoned ground – the remains of metal works and spoil tips – a quarry and many culverted and diverted underground waterways.

And under that, a pre-industrial bucolic landscape of rolling hills, streams and brooks, meadows and mills. Very little of that remains, except in the place names, which echo as ghosts of the past in people’s everyday speech. I’ve found that many of the local residents hadn’t realised that these reflect the area’s buried history. The names are in the image above, they’re beautiful in both languages. Some are very specific, for instance “Caepistyll – The Field with a Spouted Waterfall”, but I’m not sure what exactly a spouted waterfall is. I was told it’s a waterfall that seems to flow upwards in certain conditions, but that sounds odd to me. Any geographers out there?

As I walk around following these place names, I imagine what it must have looked like before the brutality of the Industrial Revolution and 20th century urban sprawl.

Walk Waun Wen, Talk Waun Wen is part of the Home and Hinterland art project in partnership with Swansea University’s Taliesin Arts Centre.

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the antique taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these vintage artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

The Tech Genius And Art In The Wet

10 Jan

I’ve just changed the home page of my website for the next couple of months to show what I’m doing with the Home and Hinterland community arts project in Waun Wen, which is funded by Swansea University’s Taliesin Arts Centre. I’ve done more than 30 blog posts about it so far, and my tech genius (Husb) has pulled it all together in one place – I was surprised how much is there already and there’s another two months (nearly) to go, where I’ll be doing loads more arty stuff. If the Covid stays away. And the rain. Never mind, I can do art in the wet 😀

So please click on the big SCRIBBLAH at the top to check it out and when you’re there, click on the first picture and you’ll be able to see all the little drawing blog posts. I’m loving being there, it’s a gorgeous area, the people are lovely and the views are lush.

This work is part of the Home and Hinterland project funded by Swansea University’s Taliesin Arts Centre.

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the antique taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these vintage artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

Buried Water

9 Jan

I’ve been walking through the Waun Wen area of the city this afternoon, sketching and also taking rubbings in graphite onto paper of the “street metal”. It sounds like a type of heavy rock music, but it’s the metal bits that we generally don’t notice under our feet. Things like manhole, stopcock and drain covers which are portals to the water buried beneath.

Some of the street metal is old and when you follow it around, you get to see the history of an area underfoot. This little stopcock cover is very common, there’s no company name on it. Almost every house has one.

Sometimes though, what’s buried becomes visible again. On the boundary of the area, there’s a sink hole at the bottom the the Cwmfelin estate, which used to be the Cwmfelin Tin Works. It’s been fenced off because it’s dangerous but when you look in, there’s a strong flow of water rushing past some old-looking brickwork. Could this be the River Burlais on it’s way to join the River Tawe?

This work is part of the Home and Hinterland project funded by Swansea University’s Taliesin Arts Centre.

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the antique taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these vintage artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

Silhouette

8 Jan

This is the second of a series of sketches I’m doing from photos I took of the war memorial in Kendal in the Lake District a few months ago. It was a bright day so the statue was silhouetted against the sky, wiping out any details on the statue. I’m using a ballpoint pen into an A6 hardbound sketchbook and making a lot of use of cross hatching.

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the antique taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these vintage artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

Foreshortening And Mark Making

7 Jan

I saw a bronze sculpture of a World War 1 soldier on a memorial in Kendal in the Lake District. He was on a tall plinth and towered above me at an interesting angle, so I took a few photos from different sides and then completely forgot about them until I was browsing today and thought, “Ah! I was going to do some sketches from these. Good foreshortening”. So I had a scribble, I’ll do a few more. It’s good practice to draw from a different viewpoint and to scribble lots of marks too.

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the antique taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these vintage artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

Nature’s Opportunists

5 Jan

They get everywhere, seagulls. Here they are hanging out on chimneys in the Waun Wen area of the city. There are no gulls officially called seagulls, and the ones that gang up on people around the city are usually herring gulls. These ones weren’t doing much, but come bin collection day, they’ll be ripping open bin bags and scattering rubbish everywhere. They’re one of nature’s opportunists.

The sketch has been done as part of the Home and Hinterland arts project sponsored by Swansea University’s Taliesin Arts Centre.

scourge the seagull

Here’s one I drew a few years back, it’s stuffed, part of Swansea Museum’s Taxidermy collection. It was much easier to draw – it didn’t move!

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the antique taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these vintage artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

%d bloggers like this: