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Scribbling On The Common

22 Sep

Husb and I had a few days away last week, cautiously enjoying the relaxation in lockdown rules. We spent some time in the Lake District and I did a bit of scribbling out walking on the glorious Birkrigg Common. I used Daler Rowney Artist’s Pastels onto hand made Khadi paper. I’m facing North West in this photo, a few hundred metres behind me is the double stone circle known as The Druid’s Circle. It’s very rare – only 15 of the 250 stone circles in England are concentric so it’s protected as an Ancient Monument.

This is me with my young nephew who has been helped enormously by LATCH: The Children’s Cancer Charity over the past 3 years. We’ve got together to raise funds for LATCH, which is a small independent charity. Please click on the link below to find out more. Thanks xxx

LATCH, The Children’s Cancer Charity, Painting Fundraiser

I’ve been painting these ‘fakes’ with Ed Sumner’s Cheese and Wine Painting Club on Facebook since lockdown started in Spring 2020. I’m selling some of them to raise funds for this lovely charity which has given so much support to my young relative over the past few years.

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If you would like to see the paintings and maybe buy one, please click on the boats picture to visit the page. Thanks xxx

Sketching On A Train

18 Sep

Husb and I went away for a few days, to the Lake District and Glasgow. Hectic but great to get away after all these many months of lockdown. I love sketching on trains and did this one into my A6 leatherbound sketchbook with a ballpoint pen. I’ve been keeping sketchbooks for many years – it will be obvious when this sketch was made by the mask – everyone’s in masks.

LATCH, The Children’s Cancer Charity, Painting Fundraiser

I’ve been painting these ‘fakes’ with Ed Sumner’s Cheese and Wine Painting Club on Facebook since lockdown started in Spring 2020. I’m selling some of them to raise funds for this lovely charity which has given so much support to my young relative over the past few years.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is boats-at-arles-small.jpg

If you would like to see the paintings and maybe buy one, please click on the boats picture to visit the page. Thanks xxx

The Gloucester Hole

22 Aug

I sat on the bank of the River Wye today, in Wales, looking across at England. The river forms the border in the town of Chepstow and Husb and I did a day trip and ended up there. I had a bit of a scribble en plein air on my Khadi paper sketchpad with Daler Rowney Artists’ Soft Pastels. It’s an impressionistic drawing, because the pastels are big and chunky and the paper has a very rough surface. That small dark patch on the limestone cliffs opposite is a cave called the Gloucester Hole. The river is very brown and muddy just here but it’s a gorgeous little town and river bank.

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left and to see the complete image.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

Little World In The Woods

27 Jun

I’ve been on holiday, visiting relatives in the North of England, a lovely break from the pandemic routine and the first time I’ve seen my family in about 18 months – too long but there we go. My littlest relative took me to see his special place in the local woods. He calls it Garlicville because it’s covered in wild garlic in the Spring. There’s a little stream running through the tall, dense trees and he’s been building a bridge across it with sticks he’s picked up from the ground.

He carried on building his little bridge and I sat on a moss covered trunk and sketched him. Not a particularly good sketch, I had promised myself I’d take a week off doing any art – it was a holiday after all – but I couldn’t resist quickly drawing him making his little world in the woods. I used white, black and sanguine conte crayons into a brown paper spiral bound sketchbook.

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left and to see the complete image.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

The Ice Cream Queue

1 May

Queueing has been a big feature of the pandemic lockdown and I’ve been scribbling them on and off. This was part of a queue for the ice cream van on the seafront at Criccieth in North Wales a couple of weeks ago. It was a fabulously sunny day and the local icecream, Cariad Gelato, was worth waiting for. I drew this with a Faber Castell Pitt drawing pen into an A6 bound sketchbook.

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left and to see the complete image.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

Shivering In Snowdonia

29 Apr

Here’s another sketch I made in North Wales last week. Husb and I escaped for the first time in over a year, since lockdown started, and it was fabulous, a truly beautiful place. We stopped the car to look back at a wonderful view over Lake Gwynant in Snowdonia, and I had to make a choice about how to approach the sketch. We were only stopped briefly and it was still quite cold, although sunny, and we didn’t want to hang around for long, so I chose my brown paper sketchbook and black, sanguine and white conte crayons. I blocked in the main features of the scene in front and then jumped, shivering, into the car.

It’s the last chance to enter this year’s Sky Arts Landscape Artist of the Year ……

 

Sky Arts Landscape Artist of the Year are currently looking for artists to take part in the new series of the programme.

This amazing opportunity is open to all artists over 16, resident in the UK. To enter send in a landscape artwork that you have created within the last five years, via their website.

If selected to take part in the competition you will then be given the opportunity to paint a specially chosen, stunning landscape within the UK. The prize on offer is a £10,000 commission for a major British institution plus £500 worth of art materials from Cass Art. The deadline for applying to the competition is 30th April 2021.

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The Tragic Statue In Harlech

22 Apr

Husb and I spent a few days in North Wales, only the second time we’ve been out of county for over a year, and it was lush. We went to the 13th century Harlech Castle, perched on a steep hill above a large coastal plain. Outside is a 20th century statue by Ivor Roberts-Jones, of Bendigeidfran and Gwern from the tragic legend in the Mabinogion, the Welsh book of ancient mythology.

I drew it with my home-made walnut ink and a vintage squirrel brush onto vintage Ingres paper. I started by splattering the ink across the paper and finished by adding some highlights with a white conte crayon.

Sky Arts Landscape Artist of the Year are currently looking for artists to take part in the new series of the programme.

This amazing opportunity is open to all artists over 16, resident in the UK. To enter send in a landscape artwork that you have created within the last five years, via their website.

If selected to take part in the competition you will then be given the opportunity to paint a specially chosen, stunning landscape within the UK. The prize on offer is a £10,000 commission for a major British institution plus £500 worth of art materials from Cass Art. The deadline for applying to the competition is 30th April 2021.

Big Boughs At Bodnant

21 Apr

Husb and I just had a few days in North Wales, the first time we’ve been away from home since lockdown started over a year ago. It was lovely. Lots of places are still closed because of Covid19, so we packed picnics and took off into the countryside. Our first stop was the beautiful gardens of Bodnant where I saw this incredible tree that had fallen at some point and thrown up new, contorted boughs from where it lay. I chose my homemade walnut ink and vintage squirrel brushes onto some vintage Ingres paper I was given a few years back.

Sky Arts Landscape Artist of the Year are currently looking for artists to take part in the new series of the programme.

This amazing opportunity is open to all artists over 16, resident in the UK. To enter send in a landscape artwork that you have created within the last five years, via their website.

If selected to take part in the competition you will then be given the opportunity to paint a specially chosen, stunning landscape within the UK. The prize on offer is a £10,000 commission for a major British institution plus £500 worth of art materials from Cass Art. The deadline for applying to the competition is 30th April 2021.

Rework Redraw

13 Apr

I do loads of sketches into sketchbooks but I rarely go back and work into them some more. I don’t know why, just something I’ve never thought of doing. So today I was flicking through my landscape Khadi sketchbook to see how many pages I have left and I realised that I had done mostly quite light and insubstantial pencil or ballpoint sketches. So I grabbed some of my homemade walnut ink and a big Escoda brush and worked into this very slight drawing of the Hoad monument. I think it’s much better now it’s been reworked.

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left and to see the complete image.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

Drawing The Bronze Age Mines

18 Nov

indusrtial

I did this sketch a few days ago while Husb and I were driving back from Devil’s Bridge, via the mountain road to Rhayader. We stopped for a while at these old mines going back to the Bronze Age, near Cwmystwyth. The earliest miners about 4,000 years ago extracted copper, but from Roman times the hills have been mined for lead.

industrial 2

I drew quickly into my A3 spiral bound brown paper sketchbook from Seawhites of Brighton, with conté crayons in white, sanguine and black. The weather was terrible, cold, wet and blowing a gale so I stayed in the car. There’s only so much suffering I’m going to do for my art lol 😀

 

 

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left and to see the complete image.

Inspired by drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artefacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

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