Tag Archives: #enpleinair

Finishing A Sketchbook

29 Sep

1cefnbrynbrain

A few weeks into the pandemic lockdown, when it became obvious that it was going to last a long while, I set myself some lockdown challenges. One is to improve my painting skills, which I’ve been doing with the Friday Cheese and Wine Painting Club on Facebook, practising faking well known paintings. Another is to do Tai Chi every day, which I’ve pretty much managed. A third is to have cold showers – my family have all got into Wim Hof so I’m giving it a try – it’s hell! And I also wanted to practise charcoal drawing, something I’ve avoided for years because I didn’t like the messiness. A friend gave me a lovely Khadi sketchbook for Xmas, the paper is heavy and rough and it really suits my Daler Rowney willow charcoal.

Husb and I took a drive to the Brecon Beacons on Saturday and stopped the car to look at the magnificent view and I made the last drawing in my book – number 30. The day was brilliantly sunny but also very cold and windy, so the sketch was quick and, well, sketchy. My shadow looms darkly in the bottom left of the scene.

Here’s a short video showing what it’s like drawing at the top of a mountain.

View this post on Instagram

Working in wild windy Wales.

A post shared by Rose Davies (@rosiescribblah) on

 

 

 

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

In this one, I combined the image of the bird with snippets of text of things my Nana used to say. She used to take me to Swansea Museum a lot when I was small and I could hear her voice in the back of my head as I was sitting and drawing the birds and bugs.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

 

Carrying On Carrying On

15 Sep

trees 1 step f

I carried on working on a painting I started a couple of weeks ago, based on a charcoal drawing I did en plein air into my Khadi sketchbook. I am trying to develop a style of my own – I’ve never done much painting and it’s my lockdown challenge. I really like the German Expressionists and am finding that I’m being influenced by them. But I’ve recently reached a stage where I don’t know how – or if – to progress with the painting. I’m happy with the composition and the broad colour scheme but it feels a bit unfinished to me.

trees 1 step f detail

So I just had a quick go yesterday, developing the brushwork and putting in a creamy colour to replaced the stark white bare canvas in the previous stage. Here’s a close up. I like the quick, gestural brushstrokes but I also want to add a bit more depth and richness, not necessarily more detail.

 

 

 

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

In this one, I combined the image of the bird with snippets of text of things my Nana used to say. She used to take me to Swansea Museum a lot when I was small and I could hear her voice in the back of my head as I was sitting and drawing the birds and bugs.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

Bare Bones

10 Sep

9 Oystermouth

I started doing charcoal drawings into this Khadi sketchbook a few weeks after lockdown started. When I realised that the pandemic was going to be here for a while, I found that I was struggling to do any creative work so I decided to focus on improving skills instead. I have been doing a weekly online painting class – 15 weeks now. And I started to use up some boxes of willow charcoal I’d been given. I had never liked using charcoal before but I thought now’s the time to get over it and practice. I’ve nearly finished the sketchbook and my drawings have changed. I was trying to cram in too much detail at the beginning but now I’m concentrating on the bare bones of the composition, trying to make satisfactory shapes and balancing light and dark rather than doing loads of details.

 

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

 

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

In this one, I combine some of the images with snippets of text of things my Nana used to say. She used to take me to Swansea Museum a lot when I was little and I could hear her voice in the back of my head as I was sitting and drawing the birds and bugs.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

Quick, Short And Angry

9 Sep

9 Cwmdonkin

I was in a really foul mood this evening, caught the bad side of Twitter and was raging. So Husb dragged me out for a long, fast walk.  We ended up in Cwmdonkin Park which has been one of my favourite places for drawing en plein air during the pandemic. I was still in a temper when I did the drawing, the marks I made with the charcoal are quick, short and angry ….. a bit like me.

 

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

 

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

In this one, I combine some of the images with snippets of text of things my Nana used to say. She used to take me to Swansea Museum a lot when I was little and I could hear her voice in the back of my head as I was sitting and drawing the birds and bugs.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

 

Carry On Painting….

7 Sep

I’m carrying on today with a painting I started a couple of weeks ago. I left it alone for a while because I wasn’t sure how to develop it so I had a break to look at it with fresh eyes.

It’s based on a charcoal drawing I did en plein air into my Khadi sketchbook. I’ve been practicing painting a lot throughout the lockdown, it’s been my challenge to myself as I wanted to improve my skills. I’m a great admirer of the German Expressionists, especially Gabrielle Munter, so I’m using colour to invoke mood and atmosphere rather than trying to be naturalistic. I’m using Liquitex heavy body acrylic paints, mostly transparent, onto a primed Winsor & Newton canvas. Here are the previous stages below…

 

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

 

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

In this one, I combine some of the images with snippets of text of things my Nana used to say. She used to take me to Swansea Museum a lot when I was little and I could hear her voice in the back of my head as I was sitting and drawing the birds and bugs.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

 

A Patchwork Of Landscape

6 Sep

Brynamman

Husb and I went to visit family in the countryside a few miles out of the city earlier. I wanted to do some charcoal drawing in my Khadi sketchbook so we drove up above Brynamman into the hills. The area is large and bleak, with few significant features which made it hard to draw as there is no particular focus. I concentrated on the shapes formed by natural, agricultural and industrial features. They’ve all left an imprint on a vast scale, turning the landscape into a patchwork of abstract shapes and patterns.

 

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

 

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

In this one, I combine some of the images with snippets of text of things my Nana used to say. She used to take me to Swansea Museum a lot when I was little and I could hear her voice in the back of my head as I was sitting and drawing the birds and bugs.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

 

Drawing On The Housing Estate

1 Sep

1 Port Mead

Husb and I went picking the very last of the summer blackberries earlier this evening on a housing estate on the outskirts of the city. I’ve been doing a lot of charcoal drawings into my Khadi sketchbook throughout the lockdown but mostly of parks and trees, occasionally the beach. Today I thought I’d draw a view with some modern architecture. When I look at the work of many artists I admire who have depicted townscapes – Gabrielle Munter and Vincent van Gogh for example – it strikes me that although the scenes look quaint and olde worlde now, at the time they were done they were contemporary. So I thought that the next development for my en plein air drawings should include some contemporary scenes as well. I don’t know how or if it will develop, let’s see….

 

 

 

 

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

In this one, I combined the image of the bird with snippets of text of things my Nana used to say. She used to take me to Swansea Museum a lot when I was small and I could hear her voice in the back of my head as I was sitting and drawing the birds and bugs.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

 

A Tough Decision

7 Jun

I did something yesterday that’s made a lot of people angry. I knew it would and I knew the risks but I decided to go ahead and do it and also do my best to minimise the risks to others. I went to the #BlackLivesMatter protest in Swansea.

Demo

It wasn’t a hasty decision and I was masked, gloved, sanitised and as I’m an anti-social git anyway, kept well away from others and didn’t speak to anyone else.

It was quite large, but in a very big space and most of the people I saw had masks on – the organisers were handing out masks to the very few who arrived without. Because it’s on the flat, I couldn’t see the whole crowd, but social distancing seemed to be happening around me and not many people were moving around.

My actions upset a lot of people, and I respect their point of view, but we’ll have to agree to disagree. The event was organised with the approval of the police and local authority, the police were there and there was no trouble. I felt it was safer than any shop I’ve been in since lockdown and safer than walking through the city centre, where few people wear masks or move out of their way to keep their distance. Will it cause a spike in Covid19 cases? Time will tell.

I also finished cutting two small lino blocks, printed them onto cotton fabric and they will be made up into masks as part of a large scale ongoing pandemic art project. I’ve been waiting for a supply of lino to arrive and now it has, I hope to move quickly on this. It’s going to be big.

I’ve upset some people by allying myself with #BlackLivesMatter.  Lots of arguments about this online, but I’m not going to rehash them here. The Black Lives Matter movement exists to to build local power and to intervene when violence is inflicted on Black communities by the state and vigilantes. Please click on the link if you want to make a donation. Thank you.

Some of the angry people I’ve encountered have been very vocal about the late Lee Rigby. The  Lee Rigby Foundation and Lyn Rigby, Lee’s mother, have acted with dignity and grace and requested that people stop doing this and that Lee’s memory is respected. Their thoughts and support go out to George Floyd’s family. The Foundation supports military families, veterans and personnel whatever their ethnic background, creed, sexuality, gender. Please click on the link to make a donation. Thank you.

Scribbling At Speed

2 Feb

sunday dinner

Sometimes there’s a lot of pressure to always turn out a ‘proper’ drawing but I don’t think that’s what sketchbooks are for. Artists need to practice, just as musicians do and my sketchbook is, for me, a great way to practice. Speed drawing helps to hone skills, forcing you to focus on what’s absolutley vital in the subject. I scribbled this in about a minute earleir today when I was having a pub lunch. The father and his little girl were at the bar and I had to work quickly to catch something as the child was excited and rushing around. I used a ballpoint pen into my A6 sketchbook.

Slow Work

31 Jan

cutting 4

The reality of making a work of art, cutting away at a small lino block using a very small tool and making the tiniest of cuts while hoping that I don’t cut the wrong bit. It’s slow work.

cutting 5

I won’t try to cut every last detail at the first go, I’ll cut close but not right up to the edges and then check to see if it needs more cutting.

cutting 6

I put a piece of tracing paper over the design and rubbed it gently with a soft 2B pencil so I can see how the cutting is going.

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