Tag Archives: Rosehill Quarry Swansea

Mucking Around

11 May

I need to loosen up with paint. I’m happy to sit and doodle for ages with a pen or pencil into my sketchbook, without bothering what I end up with. But as soon as I get the paints out, I seize up. I pressurise myself to do something “proper”. The other thing I don’t do much of is develop work from my sketchbook, as soon as it’s in there, I close the book and rarely look at it again. So today I grabbed a bit of heavyweight Khadi paper and a cheap set of acrylic paints and used my recent sketch from Rosehill Quarry as a starting point. Then I mucked around with the paint and a couple of brushes. It’s no masterpiece but it was relaxing and some of it is quite interesting.

 

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

 

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left and to see the complete image.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

 

Scribbling And Song In The Old Quarry

7 May

Lockdown is easing and things are starting to happen. Husb and I went to Rosehill Quarry at tea time to listen to Swansea folk musician, Angharad Jenkins, perform her recent song about the Quarry. It was a lovely sunny and warm Spring afternoon and Angharad sang to a group of local people of all ages against a backdrop of lush trees and shrubs. I used lots of mark-making to represent the foliage and I like the contrast with the simple line drawing of the figure. If you’re in the area, check it out, it’s a gorgeous nature reserve so close to the heart of the city.

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left and to see the complete image.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

The Labyrinth

4 Aug

labyrinth

Today, Husb and I went to help with the annual maintenance at the labyrinth in Rosehill Quarry, installed back in 1987 by Bob Shaw and Dewi Bowen. It’s based on an ancient Cretan design and is cut into the grass, the incised path filled with crushed cockle shells that are a by-product of the local seafood industry. It’s an important place for Husb and me because this is where we met back in the 1980’s. Britain was in the middle of a recession, there was mass unemployment, especially affecting young people and graduates. Husb and I were both out of work and ended up involved in a job creation programme that paid unemployed people to work part-time on community projects.

Local residents had started a group to reclaim this amazing inner-city wild space and turn it into one of the first urban wildlife refuges in the country. The Cretan labyrinth is a lasting legacy of their vision and foresight and a subsequent generation of residents have been active in keeping Rosehill Quarry maintained and open for all to enjoy.
labyrinth 1

Here I am a while back sketching the labyrinth in chalk, charcoal and soft pastels.

 

 

Love And The Labyrinth

13 Jan

13 labyrinth

It was a bright, sunny, though cold, afternoon and Husb and I strolled up the hill to Rosehill Quarry to walk the labyrinth. It’s based on an ancient Cretan design and is cut into the grass, the incised path filled with crushed cockle shells that are a by-product of the local seafood industry. It’s an important place for Husb and me because this is where we met twenty seven years ago. Back in the 1980’s, Britain was in the middle of a terrible economic recession, there was mass unemployment, especially affecting young people and graduates and there was a Conservative government in power. Sound familiar? Husb and I were both out of work and ended up involved in a job creation programme that paid unemployed people to work part-time on community projects.

Local residents had started a group to reclaim this amazing inner-city wild space and turn it into one of the first urban wildlife refuges in the country. The Cretan labyrinth is a lasting legacy of their vision and foresight. And Husb and I have been together ever since :). This was scribbled quickly – it was so cold – into my small Khadi hand-made paper sketchbook with conte crayon in white, sanguine and black, with highlights and lowlights picked out in oil pastels and compressed charcoal. I had previously prepared the paper with a random wash of dilute Indian ink.

If you’re in the Swansea area, please do visit Rosehill Quarry and walk the labyrinth for yourself. If it isn’t walked regularly, it will simply disappear. Here it is on Google Maps.

 

By the way, this is my 500th post 😀 😀 😀 Thank you for reading x

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