Tag Archives: Khadi paper

The Difference Of Materials

14 Apr

 

The difference of materials. I was engrossed in drawing at Galerie Simpson on Swansea’s High Street a couple of days ago. I’d taken a few sheets of very different papers and lots of drawing materials and I settled down to draw a fascinating clay sculpture by Tomos Sparnon which is in the current exhibition.

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The first drawing I did in white, sanguine and black conté crayons onto a piece of smooth heavyweight cartridge paper that I had prepared with a coat of white acrylic gesso and then when it was dry I sponged it all over with my sepia home-made walnut ink. After drawing in conté crayons, I filled the area around the drawing with a square ended brush dipped in the walnut ink. I love the way the ink flows over gessoed paper and how it holds the brushstrokes. It’s a delicious ink to use, like liquid silk.

 

Then I moved my chair to take in a different angle and drew, again with the white, sanguine and black conté crayons onto a sheet of heavily textured grey Khadi paper. The result is completely different. I know I’m stating the blatantly obvious, but I was surprised at the extent of the differences. You can just see Tomos’ sculpture in the background.

 

Land Of Ice And Fire

4 Nov

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Husb and I visited Iceland (the country, not the shop) three winters ago and we managed to get a really cheap package deal to go again in a couple of weeks. It’s a fabulous place for an artist, although hard to draw outside in winter temperatures. I tried out different preparations for the papers I took last time so I’ll be replicating those when I go again. You need robust, thick paper, like a heavyweight Khadi, or card – I used mount board (matte board). I laid down some colours onto my papers and cards with ink washes and acrylics last time and drew over them with oil bars and soft pastels. I’ll be doing that again. My usual M.O. of lightweight sketchbook and drawing pens just doesn’t stand up to the moisture in the air and the piercing cold.

We’re hoping to see the Aurora Borealis this time – they didn’t show up on our last visit and I’ve booked myself into a half-day introduction at the Icelandic Elf School.

Experiments At Pentre Ifan

17 Oct

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I spend a couple of days in Pembrokeshire drawing dolmens. I managed to get to 4 sites and did some sketching in the field, not easy as I forgot to take my drawing board so I was drawing on grass or even the stones themselves. I tried out some different techniques. These first two drawings at Pentre Ifan are drawn into my small Khadi handmade paper sketchbook that I had pre-coloured with a dark ink wash sploshed on randomly with a sponge. I drew with my Daler Rowney artist’s oil pastels, using white, pale blue and two tones of green. I filled in the negative spaces with the pastels – the dark stones are the ink-washed paper.

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Pentre Ifan burial chamber, Nevern, Pembrokeshire, Wales

 

catacomb

Then I tried experimenting with a piece of Fabriano Accademica paper that I had already drawn on some months ago. I visited St. Paul’s catacombs in Malta last Winter and when I came back, I developed some of my sketches into larger drawings with my home-made walnut ink. I didn’t much care for most of them and I’ve been planning on re-using them and this is my first attempt, drawn with carbon and oil pastels, both by Daler Rowney. I like the idea of overlaying an ancient burial chamber onto an ancient burial site, but I’m not sure what I think of the drawing itself. I’ll sleep on it.

Exile

15 Mar

2015 beach 1

It’s day two of my self-imposed exile from the Galaxy Samsung Tablet and digital drawing. I took my Khadi handmade sketchbook to the beach at twilight with some carbon and chalk. I had prepared the book with a sponge and Indian ink which gives a varied surface on the heavily textured paper. The drawing isn’t an exact copy of what was there but an impression, an interpretation, combining what was in front of me with what was already on the page. That’s a departure for me as well, I rarely work from my imagination. It’s interesting to do this and to see what develops. I think it’s an important part of my practice to push out of my comfort zone and try new things.

 

Dis-Comfort Zone

14 Mar

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I’m trying to get away from digital drawing on my Samsung Galaxy Note for a while because I think it’s become my new comfort zone, taking over from my Faber Castell Pitt drawing pens. I soaked a piece of natural sponge in some dilute Indian ink and scrubbed it over quite a few of the pages of my little Khadi handmade paper sketchbook; it’s heavily textured and the ink pooled in different places across the pages, giving me some interesting patterns and tones to work over. I took it down for a walk on the edge of the beach earlier this evening with some carbon sticks and chalk and quickly sketched between some trees, working with the shapes and textures already on the page. It’s very quick and impressionistic, as far from my comfort zone as it’s possible to be. My dis-comfort zone. It will be good for me.

Random Sponging

5 Jan

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I sponged a load of Khadi handmade paper with Indian ink washes and the heavy texture of the paper created some lovely variations in tone and texture. I was stuck indoors today working at the computer so Husb and I went for a walk this evening, in the dark and drizzle. We went down to the beach which was very smudgy and atmospheric in the gentle rain.

When I got back, I looked through the sponged papers until I found some that evoked the atmosphere we’d been walking in. I rubbed some black carbon and white chalk onto parts of it. I normally work directly from life, so it’s a big change for me to work completely intuitively and at random.

Paper Love

4 Jan

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I love paper! I love it, adore it, when I was little I even ate it! I love to possess as many papers as I can afford. I love to try them out with different media and see what they’re capable of. This is handmade Khadi paper. I doused it with an Indian ink wash using a natural sponge and the texture of the paper created some nice stippling.

I have been trying to work out how to draw local landscape, which is very atmospheric. I particularly want to try out ways of capturing twilight and darkness and preparing the paper in this way is showing some promise. I added some highlights and lowlights with chalk and carbon but most of the work had been done.

Quality Counts

15 Oct

pink mountain

I spent a couple of hours at Swansea Print Workshop yesterday and carried on with the series of small monotypes based on impressionistic drawings of the Punjabi landscape I travelled through earlier this year. The originals were drawn with Daler Rowney artist quality soft oil pastels into a Khadi handmade paper sketchbook. It’s important to use the best quality materials otherwise the artwork won’t last.

Someone asked me for advice a while ago; she’d bought a large pastel drawing and had it framed with archival quality materials. It was hung on a dry interior wall out of direct light and nowhere near a radiator but it had faded almost to nothing over the five years she’d had it. It was obvious that the artist had used inferior, probably student quality, pastels and hadn’t used top quality, acid-free paper.

In the interim, the artist had died so there was nothing she could do about it. This monotype is printed onto BFK Rives handmade paper, 250gsm with Caligo litho/relief oil-based inks. It should last a few centuries.

Supermoon Random

9 Sep

supermoon

We’ve had a fabulous supermoon the past couple of nights. I had prepared some Khadi handmade paper sketchbook pages with Indian ink wash some months ago. It had stippled heavily over some parts of the sheet. Inspired by the supermoon, I made just a few marks on it with a white oil bar to give the impression of moonlight over Swansea Bay. Sometimes it’s nice to do a piece of art at random, rather than draw something meticulously from life.

Husb and I went for a walk along the beach this evening. It was high tide, the moon was up and we had a workout on the free gym on the promenade. It’s a great place to live, we’re so lucky.

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A Visual Odyssey

19 Jun

 

I’ve edited all the sketchbook drawings from my Pakistan residency into a short film with Adobe Premiere Pro. I drew them consecutively as I journeyed through the country and I also recorded sounds as I went along on my phone, so I’ve added a soundtrack as well. Isn’t technology brilliant?

The drawings were made with Daler Rowney artists’ soft pastels into a Khadi handmade paper sketchbook, 6 inches square which I scanned into my PC. The sounds were recorded on a Samsung Galaxy S3 mini.

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