Tag Archives: screenprinting

The Bugs

6 Oct

 

Here’s a selection of bugs from my series of silkscreened postcard-sized prints I did recently at Swansea Print Workshop. One’s a cockchafer and the other a violet ground beetle from a collection at Swansea Museum’s archives.

 

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I printed some onto paper prepared with chine collé. I had printed sheets of handmade paper made from recycled saris, using a Gelli plate, Caligo relief inks and discarded fruit nets to create patterns. Please click here to find out more. They’re busy little critters ….

A Tissue Issue

5 Oct

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Workibng with Kelly Stewart at Swansea Print Workshop last week, I experimented with different ways to screenprint my range of drawings. I’ve always liked the chine collé technique especially with handmade paper made from recycled saris. I get it from the haberdashers in Swansea Market and it has a great texture and a some juicy colours.

 

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I used Japanese Nori glue to stick it down – it’s made with seaweed. The sari paper is quite thin, but very strong, so it was easy to silkscreen over it – thicker paper might have caused some technical problems. The term chine collé is French for tissue collage and these fine papers have traditionally been imported from Chine, Japan and the Indian subcontinent.

 

The Bits In The Middle

4 Oct

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The first stage in producing my recent set of screenprints was doing the drawings.

 

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Then came the bit in the middle. I had to produce a set of transparencies. Some were photocopied from the original drawings onto a special Overhead Projector (OHP) acetate – the two bugs and the heron.

 

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Some were redrawn onto cellophane using a brush and black acrylic paint – the two snipe. One was photocopied directly onto good quality tracing paper – the fruit net. And the text was handwritten onto Trugrain film using a Faber Castell Pitt drawing pen.

 

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The final stage is to transfer the transparencies onto a silkscreen.

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Beginning To End

3 Oct

snipe

I started with an ink and wash sketch of a snipe (using my homemade walnut ink at Swansea Museum) drawn with brushes.

 

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Then, at Kelly Stewart’s screenprinting session at Swansea Print Workshop, I redrew it onto cellophane with brushes and black acrylic paint. These are the transparencies I used to create photoscreens.

 

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And then I screened them onto different papers, Fabriano and Somerset, with Daler Rowney System 3 Acrylic paint, mixed with Screenprint medium in an 80:20 paint to medium ratio.

 

That’s it from beginning to end.

The Cheeky Cockchafer

2 Oct

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Another of the small silkscreen prints I did recently. I started off by redrawing a little sketch of a snipe, but this time I did it onto cellophane with black acrylic paint. That formed a transparency for transferring to a photoscreen. I wanted to incorporate bits of rubbish to reflect the environment that much of our wildlife has to put up with. I used the net from a bag of fruit and put it through a photocopier onto a piece of good quality tracing paper. This became another transparency. I printed with Daler Rowney System 3 acrylic mixed 80:20 with screenprint medium onto Fabriano paper.

 

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Here’s a variation on the theme, with a cheeky cockchafer sneaking in ….

Things My Nana Used To Say…

1 Oct
A heron, a beetle and what my Nana used to say....

 

Here’s another of the small silkscreen prints I did recently. It’s a combination of several images – a heron, a cockchafer (melonontha melonontha) and a violet ground beetle (carabus violaceus) – that I had drawn from Swansea Museum’s archive collection, and they’re overlaid onto a piece of text.

I was working with a group of artists on a weekend course led by the Edinburgh-based artist Kelly Stewart. I was getting a bit stuck in the initial design stage, with quite a lot of wildlife drawings but nothing ‘graphic’ to tie them together. Kelly suggested text so I quickly scribbled some sayings that I used to hear from my Nana and other elderly women relatives.

I wrote with a Faber Castell Pitt drawing pen onto a piece of Trugrain film which provided a transparency to be exposed in the UV Unit at Swansea Print Workshop. More about the technical stuff tomorrow …. 

Herstory, Heroines and Swansea Satire

21 Jun

Bog Art and MWGA launch: Cinema & Co, Swansea, Tuesday July 9th from 18.30 – 20.30 with art, literature, short films, a pop-up kitchen and FREE CAKE! Please come along.

Rosie Scribblah and Patti McJones (aka The Revolting Women) are officially launching Bog Art alongside the launch of the satirical book “Making Wales Great Again” (M.W.G.A.) by Swansea author “Notsogreatdictator “.

 

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What is Bog Art?

If you want people as in “The People” to see art where’s the best place to put it? Art galleries are where art lives but not everyone see themselves as the sort of person who goes to art galleries which is why lots of people don’t go to art galleries, but everyone has to use the toilet!  So we thought why not let “The People” take in some culture as they take a seat in Cinema & Co.  We put artwork on the walls in the toilet in case you’re not very clear on exactly what we did.  All the work features women artists and heroines and is by me and Patricia McKenna Jones. We are both very interested in the role of women in history and art and take great pains to bring their often-forgotten contributions to light again.  Not just because they are women but also because their work and lives are uniquely inspiring and show a depth of commitment and skill that needs to be seen and recognised.

Herstory

 

My work is a set of silk screen prints of my favourite artists including Kathe Kollwitz. I’ve loved her work for many years and I think she’s one of the greatest artists of the twentieth century. I defy anyone to go around the Kathe Kollwitz gallery in Berlin and not cry – her work is profoundly moving. She suffered the tragedy of losing her son in World War 1 and her grandson in WW2 and her war memorial, ‘The Grieving Parents’ in the Vladsio German War Cemetery is imbued with a terrible sadness and hopelessness.

Heroines

Patti’s paintings are about women who fought to defeat fascism during WWII.  One is Noor Inayat Khan (1914-1944) a half Russian, half Indian Muslim woman who signed up to the Special Operations Executive (a secret army with the aim of helping resist Hitler):  She helped foil enemy operations in occupied France but was eventually captured and shot at Dachau after proving her worth many times over.

 

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M.W.G.A.

Swansea author Notsogreatdictator  (not his real name) is also launching his new book of satirical snippets based on the weirder and dafter aspects of life in Wales and especially Swansea. Copies will be available for sale and he’ll be there to sign them.

 

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Food, Drink and Cake

There will be a pop-up kitchen from Goggi (including vegan food), the excellently stocked Cinema & Co bar and FREE CAKE made by Patti, Notsogreatdictator and me.

Here’s How It Goes

Here’s the itinerary for the evening, we would love to see you there –

18:30-19:00
Grab some food and drink and Meet the Author and Artists
19:00-19:30
Short films and background to “Making Wales Great Again” and Bog Art
19:30-20:00
Question and answer session with the author
20:00 – 20.30
Book signing and Bog Art viewing

Mother And Daughter

17 Mar

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I organised an exhibition and event for International Women’s Day last week at Swansea’s Cinema & Co, showcasing women artists, makers and entrepreneurs from the Swansea area. Mother and daughter Lynne and Leila Bebb are featured. Lynne Bebb is a sculptor and printmaker and has exhibited a trio of screenprinted monotypes with her daughter Leila as the subject. Leila is a performance artist and we showed this film of her contemporary dance piece, “Shattering“. So much talent in one family.

Shattering from Lynne Bebb on Vimeo.

 

The film was choreographed by Jessie Brett with original music by Jered Sorkin and supported by The Welfare, Ystradgynlais.

 

Hanging With Camille Claudel

11 Nov

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I’m exhibiting at “The Uncredited Woman” at Llanover Hall in Cardiff CF5 1FH until December 8th. Here I am at the opening of the Women’s Arts Association annual show, with the work I submitted, a screenprint of the French sculptor Camille Claudel. I used the liquid stencil method to prepare the screen, working from one of my drawings of her. If you want to find out more about the process, please click here.

 

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Stamping!

5 Jul

I’m going to be running some creative training sessions soon and one of them is going to be about stamping. That’s not moving your feet up and down with force, but the practice of creating new artworks from rubber – or lino or wood – stamps. I’ve been doing some work in this technique, inspired by artists Atif Khan, Ryan McGinnis and Federico Pietrella. Here are some different ways I’ve been using a stamp I had made from a screenprint I did of my hero, German artist Käthe Kollwitz. On the left, a ‘mashup’ with a newspaper fragment; in the middle a 3D construction from Shiohara paper and aluminium armature wire; on the right a stitched piece with chine collé.

 

Here are some examples of work from other artists using stamps too. From left to right, Federico Pietrella, Ryan McGinnis, Atif Khan.

 

 

 

 

For a limited period I am putting a new drawing from my recent sketch books on my Artfinder gallery every day.  If you’d like to check them out, please click on the image below or the Artfinder link at the top right of this page.

 

 

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