Tag Archives: Gower Peninsula

Foggy And Hangliding

30 Dec

worms head

Husb and I met up with some friends today for a good walk down at Rhossili, one of the most beautiful beaches in the world and a short drive from where we live. I took a brown paper sketchbook and some conté crayons to have a bit of a scribble. It was windy, cold and damp which didn’t make it easy to draw en plein air, so I stopped after a quick sketch. We walked down the steep path to the beginning of the causeway to the islands, which were cut off by the tide and then clambered back up the hillside. It was really foggy when we arrived but it lifted and some people took to hangliding above the huge beach.

Collage En Plein Air

29 Dec

Foxhole 7

Husb and I went for a walk down to Foxhole Bay on the Gower Peninsula today, partly to get some exercise and also to get some art work done en plein air. The land and sea are very rugged and I decided not to draw but to do some collage using papers I prepared quite a while ago, scribbling over recycled prints with oil pastels. I also had some sheets of sturdy watercolour paper that I had brushed with my home-made walnut ink.

 

 

We clambered down a steep, rough path and settled about 30 feet above sea level, on a flat area that is the remains of a rare Ipswichian raised beach, which was the sea level sometime in the past, probably before the last Ice Age. It was a good place to work, I laid out my board and ripped the different collage papers, laying them down on the watercolour paper and rearranging them, taking photos as I worked, inspired by, rather than slavishly copying, the environment around me. It’s an interesting way to work outside; the work of art is ephemeral, it exists in the camera. When I finished I smooshed the paper back into my folder to use another day.

Cockle Shells And A Labyrinth

15 Aug

labyrinth

Thirty one years ago I was working on a local environmental programme, The Rosehill Quarry Project, a community-led scheme to clear and renovate an old quarry near the city centre and turn it into a nature reserve and leisure area for local people. One of the things we did was to work with Welsh prehistorian, Dewi Bowen, to cut a Cretan labyrinth into the turf and line it with cockle shells, a local resource from the Gower Peninsula cockle industry. Over the years, people have gathered to maintain the labyrinth and there was a work group just a week or so ago.

labytinth martin slucutt

The labyrinth after last week’s renovation. Photograph by Martin Slucutt.

 

I did the drawing above onto newspaper with pastels, charcoal and chalk, from the first viewing point on the path up to Pantycelyn Road.

 

 

The Melted Rocks

24 Jul

Paviland wordpress

One of my favourite places is Paviland, a strange otherworldly cove on the coast of the Gower Peninsula which is the site of the Goat’s Hole Cave, famous for the skeleton of the  “Red Lady of Paviland“, which is actually a young man. From the main road, it’s a fair walk across fields via a marked footpath before the ground drops sharply and narrows into a steep rocky valley down to the beach. The slippery and difficult rocks look as if they have been melted and are splashed with colour from mosses and lichens and veins of different minerals coursing through them. I always take a sketchbook when I visit and I made this large monotype from one of my sketches.

 

A Last Little Quickie

11 Aug

quickie 2

And here’s the last of the very quick watercolour sketches I made recently, sitting in the sunshine on the clifftop in Southgate overlooking the sea. I concentrated on capturing the flow of the colours before me, rather than recording details. I’ve never been particularly into land / seascape art so I don’t have any hard and fast rules to influence me. I’m just hanging out doing my own thing. I used Winsor & Newton half pan watercolours with a glued block of Waterford watercolour paper from St. Cuthbert’s Mill.

 

I am putting my series of drawings of ancient Welsh monuments on Artfinder.  If you’d like to see them, please click on the image below or the Artfinder link at the top right of this page.

St Elvis

Quickies In The Sun

5 Aug

3 quickies in the sun

A dry and sunny day in August is as rare as hen’s teeth in these here parts so despite smothering with a cold and sore throat, Husb and I put on our jackets and drove down to Southgate on the Gower Peninsula for a couple of hours. I sat in the sunshine on the clifftop and did some quick and tiny watercolour studies, en plein air, using Winsor & Newton half pans onto a rough Saunders Waterford watercolour paper (300 gsm) from St. Cuthbert’s Mill which comes as a glued block. I haven’t used glued paper before and it’s brilliant, no need to stretch the paper before use. I tried to ignore the detail of what I saw before me and concentrate on getting down the colours while Husb picked blackberries. He’s in the kitchen now, getting this year’s Bramble Jelly started. mmmmmmmm 😀

 

The Last Howes

3 Jun

Sweynes Howse 5

This is the last of the drawings I did recently of Sweyne’s Howes, this is the more complete northern one. These Neolithic monuments, over 4,000 years old, are part of a lengthy series I have been drawing over the past year and a bit with prehistorian Dewi Bowen and filmmaker Melvyn Williams. We are tracking the Neolithic and Bronze Age monuments that lie along the trail of The Boar Hunt / Y Twrch Trwyth from the book of ancient Welsh legend, The Mabinogion. Dewi is researching for his next book, I’m developing a large body of drawings and prints and Melvyn is filming it all. We’re launching an exhibition, a short film and a small booklet next month at Swansea’s Cinema & Co. More to come……..

The Northern Howes

2 Jun

Sweynes Howse 4

Here’s the second of the two ancient burial chambers I drew recently at Rhosilli on the Gower Peninsula. This is the northern Sweyne’s Howes, much more complete than the ruinous southern chamber which has been stolen over the years. These Neolithic monuments are over 4,000 years old and although named after the Viking Sweyne, who also lends his name to Swansea (Sweyne’s Ey or Island), they are considerably older than the Vikings. I am wandering South Wales with prehistorian Dewi Bowen and filmmaker Melvyn Williams, studying the Neolithic and Bronze Age monuments that lie along the trail of The Boar Hunt / Y Twrch Trwyth from the book of ancient Welsh legend, The Mabinogion.

Cool Places

1 Jun

I haven’t blogged for a few days because I’ve been adventuring in Berlin, just a short break with family. Cool place, had a great time and I even did some drawings. I just got back, about an hour ago and it’s 10pm so I’ll just post a quick drawing I did a couple of weeks ago, when I was last out with prehistorian Dewi Bowen and filmmaker Melvyn Williams.

Sweynes Howse 3

Here’s a second sketch I did at another cool place, the Neolithic Sweyne’s Howes burial site at Rhossili,  this is the ruined southern Howse. I used black, sanguine and white conté crayons into an A4 brown paper sketchbook.

Sweynes Howse 6

 

Ruinous

24 May

Sweynes Howse 2

A warm but foggy morning wasn’t ideal for megalith hunting but off I went anyway, with prehistorian Dewi Bowen and filmmaker Melvyn Williams to visit the Neolithic Sweyne’s Howes burial site at Rhossili. This is the ruinous southern Howse. I enjoyed drawing in the thick mist, so atmospheric, although it was a challenge to draw the mistiness onto the paper. I used black, sanguine and white conté crayons into an A4 brown paper sketchbook.

%d bloggers like this: