Tag Archives: art for sale

Ban The Bedroom Tax!

14 Mar

bedroom tax

This is a monotype I made from an original drawing I did in my sketchbook at a demonstration against the “Bedroom Tax”, or Spare Room Subsidy, introduced by the government in 2012. It resulted in hardship for many people. It’s one of the artworks I’m exhibiting at Swansea’s Cinema & Co in a joint show with fellow artist Patti McJones. It’s called Revolting Women.

Revolting Women

LAST CHANCE TO SEE Print From Two Cities

11 Jan

 

INVITE2

 

Only a few more days to catch this exhibition of contemporary printmaking from Swansea and Cardiff Print Workshops – it’s last day is Monday the 8th of February.
This exhibition brings together some of the best recent print work from members of Cardiff Print Workshop and Swansea Print Workshop. It celebrates the work of these two contemporary organisations, both dedicated to the art of printmaking in Wales today with artists Eleanor Whiteman; Anne Giles Hobbs; Judith Stroud; Rose Davies (Rosie Scribblah); Kara Seaman; Sally Williams; Sue Edwards; Bill Chambers.

Please pop in to the exhibition – Penarth is a lovely place well worth a visit 🙂

hung

‘Hung’, a print-based installation from Rosie Scribblah

Penarth Pier Pavilion, The Esplanade, Penarth, CF64 3AU

Stitching And Tying

6 Jan

I’m working flat out to finish this print installation made up of almost 50 small prints on Shiohara paper sewn onto handmade Tate Gallery Indian paper. I’m assembling them onto a wooden clothes horse. I had originally intended to put them on with wooden pegs but the bars are too thick for pegs so I’m stitching ribbon onto the prints and then tying them on. I’m getting there ….. maybe another couple of hours of sewing to go.

nearly there

I’ve been using a gorgeous antique Singer sewing machine, Edwardian and over 110 years old, and here’s a short video of it in action. I love old machines – I get mechanics, so easy to fix, just a screwdriver and maybe a pair of pliers. This installation will be exhibited soon at the Penarth Pier Pavilion Gallery as part of a joint exhibition between Swansea and Cardiff Print Workshops. Please click here for more details.

Cake, Tea, Art

13 Dec
opening 1

The opening crowd at The SPace spied through my developing installation using my new rubber stamp and some Shiohara paper.

After three weeks of painting, cleaning, drilling, humping furniture, doing risk assessments, form filling, dealing with bureaucracy, getting rained on, labelling and putting artwork onto walls and into browsers, Swansea’s newest artspace, The SPace, formally opened with a Welsh tea on Friday evening.

opening 2

Some of my artwork, silkscreen prints and drawings, on the left. My work is available for sale through Artfinder, please click the link on my blog or search for Rosie Scribblah on Artfinder

It was great! Such a lovely atmosphere, lots of really lovely people, gorgeous art, Swansea Print Workshop’s new book (fully illustrated and a snip at £9.95), Welsh teatime delicacies bara brith and Welsh cakes, along with jammy tarts, chocolate brownies (gluten-free), mince pies, vol-au-vents (retro!), cheesy biscuits and lashings of tea and a spot of mulled wine as well. Lovely.

opening 3

Home-made Welsh teatime treats

It’s an offshoot of Swansea Print Workshop; a temporary collective of 14 of our members getting The SPace together for 12 weeks in a property owned by Coastal Housing Group at 217 High Street. The SPace is open Wednesdays to Saturdays, 11.30 – 5.00 between now and mid-February. Please pop in and see us if you’re in the city, or visit us at Swansea Print Workshop’s Facebook group here.

In The SPace

5 Dec

Space 1

Swansea Print Workshop has a temporary artspace, The SPace, in the heart of the city and one of the benefits is that it gives our members a pop up gallery. Here are my series of screenprinted portraits of women artists who inspire me and four of my drawings of ancestral burial sites in Pembrokeshire – I drew them in the rain a few weeks ago. There’s also a collagraph fox by Kara Seaman and a drawing by Hannah Lawson.

The SPace is open to the public Wednesdays to Saturdays, 11.30 – 5.00 until the middle of February.

Up The Mountains

29 Oct

mountain 3

Today I dropped off some new work to the wonderful Workers Gallery in Ynyshir in the Rhondda Valley. Husb and I drove up over Aberdare and Maerdy and stopped to take some photos of the rugged scenery in the late Autumn light. Wonderful place.

mountain 2

 

mountain 1

mountain 4

The new exhibition, ‘Of Site And Song’ opens on November the 5th and runs until December the 23rd. It would be lovely for people to make a little trip up to this lovely gallery and to take in the amazing landscape as well.

The Blue Stones

21 Oct

pentre ifan

I’ve been thinking about how to develop the drawings I did last weekend in North Pembrokeshire. I have seven drawings from four different Neolithic sites and I thought that one or two of them might look good as cyanotypes.

Cyanotype is an archaic form of photography invented in early Victorian times by Sir John Herschel which results in a blue image. The original charcoal and carbon drawing onto marbled paper was done in the field at the enigmatic ancient burial tomb of Pentre Ifan in the Presceli Mountains in Pembrokeshire, Wales. This striking Neolithic dolmen is almost 6 thousand years old. It is a lasting reminder of Celtic ancestors and the site is inspirational. I worked quickly in the late afternoon Autumn sunshine to catch it before the sun went down.

I turned the original drawing into a negative and coated a sheet of Bockingford paper with the cyanotype chemicals. I put the negative onto the paper and put a sheet of glass over it. I exposed it for three hours in the weak Autumn daylight, as the Victorians would have done. It was then washed in cold water to develop it.

Here’s a lovely video from Cadw, the Welsh Government’s historic environment service, showing how Pentre Ifan might have looked when it was originally built.

 

This artwork is for sale through Artfinder

 

 

The Carved Elephant – A Drypoint Etching

27 Sep

elephant

I have been doing some printmaking at The Bagpuss Window, the temporary artspace in Swansea’s High Street, making a little edition of miniature drypoints (similar to etchings). I set up a printing area around the little etching press, with an inking table, a blotting table and a drying table. I measured and ripped 8 pieces of Bockingford 250gsm paper and put them into a bucket of water to soak. I like to leave them for at least an hour.

I started out with a small sketchbook drawing I made last year during my residency at the Zaira Zaka Print Studio in Pakistan, and redrew it with a soft drawing pen onto a piece of paper drypoint plate (from Intaglio Printmakers). Then I scratched into the drawing with a lot of cross hatching and mark-making, using a drypoint tool, although a 4 inch screw will do.

I used a little rubber squeegee strip to apply drypoint etching ink – it’s important to get the right ink, ordinary etching ink doesn’t work so well. I scraped across the surface to remove surplus ink with an old plastic card and removed a little more with some tissue, wiping the edges with a clean rag. It’s vital not to overwipe, it’s surprising how much ink you can leave on the plate – it doesn’t show up on the paper.

Then I gently blotted a piece of the paper between two sheets of kitchen roll with a small roller – just to remove surface water, not to dry out the paper – and placed it over the etching plate on the press bed, put some clean tissue on top, put the blankets over it and wound it through the press.  Then I dried it between sheets of tissue under a heavy board to stop it from wrinkling. You can get 6-8 prints from a paper drypoint plate if you’re fairly gentle.

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