Tag Archives: Pembrokeshire

Class Glass

12 Dec

 

Dinas garage

I had a lovely surprise today. Local stained glass artist Deanne Mangold, of Class Glass Wales, came to visit with a glass panel for me based on one of my drawings of ancient standing stones. Deanne had seen some of my drawings at an exhibition, Yr Helfa / The Hunt and wanted to translate one or two into stained glass. And here’s the result. I love it, it’s gorgeous.

 

The original drawing was done in the field, literally a field behind the garage in Dinas, North Pembrokeshire, where there’s a magnificent ancient stone monument. If you want to see more of my drawings en plein air of Neolithic and Bronze Age sites in Wales, please visit my Artfinder gallery.

 

An Artist’s Inspiration

14 Jul

glass 1

Husb and I visited the very talented glass artist, Deanne Mangold, at her Open Studio today. Deanne is working up a new panel based on one of my drawings of Neolithic and Bronze Age standing stones, this one in Dinas in Pembrokeshire.

It’s very flattering that another artist finds inspiration in my work and it’s fascinating for me to see how she has interpreted my original. Deanne’s Open Studio continues tomorrow (Sunday 15th July) from 10.00 to 1.00.

flyer

Rainy Sunday

30 Apr

Sunset

Husb and I have been in West Wales all day, visiting friends. The weather when we left was gorgeous but by the time we arrived, heavy rain was moving in from the Irish Sea and scuppered our plans for a countryside walk and some quick sketching en plein air. Of course it rained, it’s a Bank Holiday weekend! Never mind, it was nice to stay in and catch up. As we drove home, I turned to look back at the North Pembrokeshire coast from the Presceli Mountains. There was a break in the rain and the evening sun shone through the thick cloud for just a few moments. I might not have managed any scribbling, but the photo opportunity made up for it.

 

I have put my series of drawings en plein air of ancient Welsh monuments on Artfinder.  If you want to see more, please click on the image below or the Artfinder link at the top right of this page. This one is the legendary grave of Saint Elfys (Elvis) in Pembrokeshire, not for from the Preseli Mountains. Elfys? Preseli? Elvis Presley? Coincidence? hhhmmmm

St Elvis

Fellow Hunters

7 Aug

Newport b2

Cerrig Y Gof is a site of five tombs just outside the village of Newport in North Pembrokeshire. They were completely overgrown with brambles and bracken but we carefully cleared most of the undergrowth away, revealing the ancient treasures underneath. We met some fellow hunters of the wild megalith and had a great conversation – we rarely see other people on our travels.

Newport b1

Since February I have been travelling across South Wales with Rhondda-born archaeologist Dewi Bowen and Swansea film maker Melvyn Williams, up mountains, through slurry, mud and bog, across beaches in all weathers accompanied by my portable drawing board, portfolio of Fabriano paper and a bag full of assorted artist’s materials.  Dewi is researching his latest book on Neolithic monuments and Melvyn is making a documentary film of our literary and artistic adventures.

I’ve done around 50 drawings now and these will be exhibited in my solo show in The Worker’s Gallery in the Rhondda Valley in September. Please click here to find out more about it.

And if you want to see some of my other artwork, please click on the image below.

Quoit

Gatepost To The Moon

6 Aug

Gatepost

Sometimes ancient stones can be found in hedges and used as gateposts. We found a fine example, a really big one in a field on the hillside near Llanychaer near the north Pembrokeshire coast. There were three large standing stones, including the gatepost, the other two in the hedge and one fallen stone at the bottom of the field. The group is called Parc Y Meirw (Field of the Dead) and they align with the moon’s highest point in the sky, a phenomenon that happens every 18.6 years. Knowledge of this cycle is useful for predicting eclipses.

Gatepost 2

I drew with conte crayon, carbon and Daler Rowney artists’ soft pastels onto Fabriano paper prepared with gesso, charcoal and my home-made walnut ink. I sat on the grass to do the drawing, it was warm and dry and I could spend some time working on it, and some jolly farm boys drove by in a tractor and called out to see my drawing. We brightened each others day.

I have been travelling across South Wales with Rhondda-born archaeologist Dewi Bowen and Swansea film maker Melvyn Williams, hunting the wild megalith, accompanied by my portable drawing board, portfolio of Fabriano paper and a bag full of assorted artist’s materials.  Dewi is researching his latest book on Neolithic monuments and Melvyn is making a documentary film of our literary and artistic adventures.

If you want to know more about my solo show in The Worker’s Gallery in the Rhondda Valley in September, please click here.

And if you want to see some of my other artwork, please click on the image below.

Quoit

 

Summer? Really?

5 Aug

Carn Llidi small chamber

So you’d think that as it’s August we’d be having some nice summer weather. You’d think. Except this is Wales and there I was in Pembrokeshire a couple of days ago, near the top of Carn Llidi, trying to draw in gale force winds. In August. In summer. Yeah.

I did as much as I could, which wasn’t much in those conditions. There are two chambered tombs on the site and this is the smaller, which was slightly protected from the gusting wind by the larger tomb. I managed to get a substantial outline drawn onto my prepared paper and took some photos so I can finish it later.

 

I have been travelling across South Wales with Rhondda-born archaeologist Dewi Bowen and Swansea film maker Melvyn Williams, hunting the wild megalith, accompanied by my portable drawing board, portfolio of Fabriano paper and a bag full of assorted artist’s materials.  Dewi is researching his latest book on Neolithic monuments and Melvyn is making a documentary film of our literary and artistic adventures.

If you want to know more about my solo show in The Worker’s Gallery in the Rhondda Valley in September, please click here.

And if you want to see some of my other artwork, please click on the image below.

Quoit

One Of Those Days

2 Apr

sheep

Husb and I drove down to Pembrokeshire today to pick up some relatives from the Irish ferry. We went down an hour earlier planning on finding some ancient monuments and do some drawing. Unfortunately the weather had a different idea and threw torrential rain and gales at us. We found a dolmen called Devil’s Quoit near a village called Angle but it was way across an incredibly muddy field that was full of cows in calving season, when they can be violent. It was the worst conditions I have tried to draw in and it just wasn’t possible so we went for a drive around the village and saw these sheep sheltering at the foot of this strange round tower.

pudding

When we got back we settled in for some mindless TV and I made a golden syrup steamed sponge pudding for tea, with lashings of custard. No drawing done though.

Through Darkness To Light

30 Mar

Drawing ‘The King’s Quoit’ from another angle, I could see underneath the capstone, through the inky darkness below the huge rock into the bright sunlight beyond.

Kings Quoit d

The shape reminded me of being in a cave, looking out through the entrance and it occurred to me that the ancient people who created these monuments might have lived in caves, or at least sought sanctuary and shelter in them and I wonder if they echoed this experience when they built their stone megaliths across the landscape?

Kings Quoit c

The King’s Quoit is situated on the cliff path above the glorious beach at Manorbier on the South Pembrokeshire coast in Wales. It’s a sub-megalithic type, where the back of the capstone rests directly on the ground without an orthostat supporting it. I drew with carbon and white conte crayon onto Fabriano paper that I had prepared in advance with my homemade walnut ink. I had originally done a very large drawing in the ink but didn’t like it so I ripped it down into smaller pieces that would fit onto my portable drawing board. I liked working over an existing image – I don’t like working directly onto white paper, it’s intimidating.

It was chilly and very windy on the cliff – here I am drawing in the short video below….

This drawing is available to buy in my Artfinder gallery here.

The Quoit Of The King

29 Mar

Manorbier dolmen

Husb and I went for a drive on Easter Monday, exploring some of the South Wales coastline that we hadn’t seen before, the lovely beach of Manorbier / Maenorbŷr in South Pembrokeshire. It’s a very ancient settlement with local evidence of flint microliths from the Mesolithic and Neolithic ages and this magnificent dolmen, The King’s Quoit, looking out over the sea from the cliff path. There are Bronze Age burial mounds, an Iron Age enclosure and evidence of Anglo Saxon farming. The imposing castle and parish church are Norman. It has a railway station and can be reached by train on the lovely West Wales line.

Kings Quoit b

Sometimes the Welsh, Maenorbŷr, is translated as Manor of Pŷr, but an alternative meaning I have seen is ‘Holy (or sacred) Stone’, which would make sense, given the magnificence of this Neolithic burial chamber. The weather was gorgeous, sunny and bright and the beach was busy with families enjoying their Easter break. But it was quite cold and blustery up on the cliff where I settled down to draw the dolmen – you can see what it was like in this short video.

I did this drawing in carbon and white conte crayon onto Fabriano Accademica paper that I had prepared with my home-made walnut ink. This is now for sale in my Artfinder gallery, please click here to see more images of it.

Rehomed

17 Feb

 

Pentre Ifan

Pentre Ifan

Back in the Autumn last year, Husb and I spend a weekend drawing ancient monuments around Pembrokeshire – in the rain, as ever. This is one I drew at Pentre Ifan, in chalk, charcoal and pastels. I drew it over an existing drawing I made in home-made walnut ink onto antique paper of the St. Paul’s catacombs in Malta. I’m chuffed that this drawing has just been sold from Artfinder and is being rehomed in North Wales. More of my work for sale can be found by clicking on the Artfinder widget on the right hand side of this page.

Tomorrow, I’m going on my travels around West Wales again to draw more ancient sites.

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