Tag Archives: Tate Gallery

A Cluster Of Heads…

8 Jun

I’ve been flipping through old sketchbooks, reminding myself of work I’d forgotten about. I came across a cluster of heads in one that I’d bought from the Tate gallery in London. Nice sketchbook. I like drawing heads and faces, but children’s faces are so difficult. The younger they are, the more they look like an alien life form. There’s a mixture of media here, graphite, charcoal pencil, Faber Castell Pitt drawing pen and biro (ballpoint).

Rainbows In Durham

28 May

 

Husb and I have been doing a mini tour of North East England over the Bank Holiday and visited the historic town of Durham yesterday, which was hosting a Pride festival. There were rainbows everywhere.  I had to have a scribble,  didn’t I? So I did a bit of pen and watercolour work en plein air. We were sat outside the Cathedral in the glorious sunshine looking across the green. There were hundreds of rainbow people, it was lovely.  When I was a child it was illegal to be gay (well, for men anyway). How far we have come, it’s brilliant.

I drew with a Faber Castell Pitt drawing pen into my Tate Gallery ‘landscape’ sketchbook and then added washes with Winsor & Newton watercolour half pans.

The School Stone Redrawn

23 Jun

Cockett Valley stone graphite

 

I’ve been travelling around South Wales drawing ancient stone monuments in the field but I’ve now started to look at the drawings and photos to decide how to develop them; maybe more complex drawings or mixed media pieces: etchings or linocuts? The first stage in this process for me is to do some small ‘thumbnail’ sketches from my original drawings and site photographs. These thumbnails help me get more acquainted with the subject as the field drawings are done very quickly and intuitively.

I’ve drawn with a fine graphite stick (6B) onto a small piece of heavyweight textured paper from the Tate Gallery shop that I had prepared by sponging lightly with a sepia wash. It’s a beautiful paper with deckled edges. This is the Cockett Valley Stone, found on the playing fields of a local comprehensive school.

 

I’ve been travelling around South Wales with archaeologist Dewi Bowen, who is researching his new book on Neolithic / Bronze Age monuments. His previous book on the stones of Ancient Siluria (South East Wales) can be found here. Also with us  is film maker Melvyn Williams, recording a documentary about our experiences. Some of Melvyn’s short films can be seen here. If you want to see some of my other artworks, please click here.

Stitching And Tying

6 Jan

I’m working flat out to finish this print installation made up of almost 50 small prints on Shiohara paper sewn onto handmade Tate Gallery Indian paper. I’m assembling them onto a wooden clothes horse. I had originally intended to put them on with wooden pegs but the bars are too thick for pegs so I’m stitching ribbon onto the prints and then tying them on. I’m getting there ….. maybe another couple of hours of sewing to go.

nearly there

I’ve been using a gorgeous antique Singer sewing machine, Edwardian and over 110 years old, and here’s a short video of it in action. I love old machines – I get mechanics, so easy to fix, just a screwdriver and maybe a pair of pliers. This installation will be exhibited soon at the Penarth Pier Pavilion Gallery as part of a joint exhibition between Swansea and Cardiff Print Workshops. Please click here for more details.

The Beautiful Machine

31 Dec

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A while back, I had a small rubber stamp made up from a silkscreen print I did based on the fabulous Frida Kahlo, an artist I admire very much. I printed it onto small leftover pieces of a beautiful Japanese Shiohara paper that I had been using for another print job.

sewing 6

I had been wondering what to do with them and I finally decided on making them up into a self-contained installation that I will be building over the next week.The first stage is to make them more robust  – the Shiohara is a lightweight tissue and won’t take a lot of handling. However, it’s also a well-made natural fibre paper and can be sewn so I made a start by sewing them onto a very robust handmade paper – 300gsm – that I’d bought at the Tate Gallery a few years ago. I’d been wondering what to do with that as well! They really suit each other.

sewing 3

I’m sewing them on an antique Singer sewing machine. It’s Edwardian and dates from around 1904 and it’s a great piece of mechanical engineering as well as being extremely beautiful. It’s so finely balanced, it’s a joy to use. I’ll be carrying on with this in a couple of days, after the holiday.

So a very happy New Year to everyone, I really appreciate you looking in at my blog. Blwyddyn Newydd Dda i chi gyd.

 

 

A Bit Of Columbian

3 Mar

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I was down at Swansea Print Workshop earlier and took some time to scribble the lovely old Columbian printing press. Dating from quite early in Queen Victoria’s reign (1855) this beauty is still in use, even though it’s a little bit wobbly and idiosyncratic. It’s quite complex and I’m right out of my comfort zone, I’m a people person, I draw people. Machinery is really alien so it’s good practice to spend some time trying to get it right. I used a Faber Castell Pitt drawing pen size M into my A5 Tate Gallery sketchbook. I haven’t done any relief (block) printing for quite a while and I’ve been fancying using some of my stash of vinyl blocks – I have a few ideas, I just need to get cutting then I can use this lovely, lovely press again.

A Vast Behind

30 Nov

giraffe

 

Back at Folly Farm yesterday, I was in the right place at the right time, standing under a fodder bucket in the Giraffe enclosure during feeding time. Rhian the giraffe was eating her scran just a couple of feet above my head! Well, I had to scribble her, didn’t I? Then she turned her attention to acacia branches hanging from the roof, so I sketched her from behind, rather a vast behind. Giraffe are HUGE! Her eye was about the size of my hand. What a magnificent animal. Drawn with a Faber Castell Pitt drawing pen, size F into my A5 Tate Gallery sketchbook.

Tube Heads

10 Nov

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Husb and I went to London on Saturday to take in some art and I always take the opportunity to do some sketching on the Tube. It’s not easy because the trains shake around a lot and they’re packed, especially at the weekend, but I managed a couple of decent heads.

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The first is using Faber Castell Pitt drawing pen, size S and the second is using graphite, both into an A5 Tate Gallery sketchbook.

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