Tag Archives: women artists

Scribbling In The Wind

23 Oct

Nice day so went for a walk out of the city, along the Pennard Pill valley route to Three Cliffs Bay. It was cloudy and very windy so I only stopped to do a quick scribble, with Daler Rowney soft pastels onto Khadi paper. There’s a stone spiral, called by locals “the labyrinth” where the valley meets the beach, so I scribbled this with the hillside in the background, a blaze of russet and rich browns against the overcast purpley-blue sky.

My lovely nephew (in the middle) along with these other wonderful young people have benefitted from the Children In Need charity and now they’re giving something back. They’re the Surprise Squad (more about them here) and you can follow their adventures on BBC1s “The One Show“, 15th – 18th November. I know that times are hard, but if you can spare a quid or two, please consider donating to Children In Need (here). They really do make a difference to young lives. Thank you xxx

Giving It A Go

22 Oct

It’s almost half a century since I rocked up, in flares and platforms, at the Foundation Course in Swansea Art School, determined to be a painter. Then I did the module in printmaking and retired my paintbrushes. Until the pandemic lockdown started in Spring last year. We were only allowed out of the house for an hour a day and I discovered Ed Sumner’s Cheese and Wine Painting Club on Facebook when I was looking for something to do to pass the time. After so many decades I thought, “Why not give it a go”. So for 15 months I have been copying great works of art, which is Ed’s way of teaching, and that gave me the confidence to start choosing my own subjects to paint, with varying degrees of success. This landscape in acrylics is based on a pastel drawing I did en plein air at Birkrigg Common in the Lake District last month.

I used a textured canvas, I scrape leftover paint from the Painting Club sessions onto spare canvases. Waste not, want not. Then I applied the coloured “ground” that Ed Sumner recommends doing. And from then on, I followed the original drawing, using Liquitex Heavy Body acrylic paints and a mixture of brushes and palette knives. I can see the influence of some of the artists we have studied, especially van Gogh and Hockney; I need to keep working at it to find my own style.

Here’s my original drawing. I prefer it to the painting, I love the immediacy and the nature of the Daler Rowney soft oil pastels onto a very rough Khadi paper. But I’m still a novice at painting so I must get more practice in.

My lovely nephew (in the middle) along with these other wonderful young people have benefitted from the Children In Need charity and now they’re giving something back. They’re the Surprise Squad (more about them here) and you can follow their adventures on BBC1s “The One Show“, 15th – 18th November. I know that times are hard, but if you can spare a quid or two, please consider donating to Children In Need (here). They really do make a difference to young lives. Thank you xxx

Faking It In The Evening

13 Oct

Started faking Salvador Dali’s painting “Christ Of Saint John Of The Cross” this evening with a Zoom tutorial by the painter Ed Sumner. Good to study this one up close and really get into the process of how Dali put it together. It’s all about the life drawing. At this stage anyway. Tutorial part 2 is next week. Tired now, off to bed……

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the antique taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these vintage artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left to see the complete image.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

Living On In The Digital World

12 Oct

Sometimes when I’m drawing I end up preferring an unfinished version, and that happened here with this recent life drawing. I often photograph them with my phone at different stages and the one above is my favourite. But you never know until you finish, and I carried on working in more detail. So the one I like best doesn’t exist in the analogue world anymore but it lives on in the digital world here.

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the antique taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these vintage artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left to see the complete image.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

Three Short Poses Over Time

11 Oct

One of the really good things about life drawing sessions at Swansea Print Workshop is the variety of models who pose for us and I enjoy working with such a range of body types and ages. This older model is very experienced and he’s been posing for our group for many years. It’s a privilege to be able to follow how a body changes over time as well as really good practice. These three poses are the first in a session, very short so we can warm up and focus on the essence of each pose instead of the details.

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the antique taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these vintage artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left to see the complete image.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

Crowd Surf My Coffin

10 Oct

Oh WOW! It was so good to be at a live gig this week, Skindred at The Tramshed in Cardiff, first gig in over 18 months. It was AWESOME! I was so energised and danced and bounced for hours (killed me for the next two days though). But I still found a bit of time to have a scribble. We were upstairs so I was looking down on the crowd in the dark and I could only see white shapes of heads, faces, arms, hands. So I scribbled them, in the dark …. why not, eh?

I added the blackness today, using a very soft charcoal pencil and a tortillon. I would have carried on scribbling but I dropped my pen over the edge of the balcony onto someone’s head – had to duck so I wasn’t spotted.

Anyway, I couldn’t scribble when Skindred was on stage because I was screaming and hollering and headbanging. There was loads of crowd surfing going on down below, and a lively mosh pit. That brought back memories. When I die I want my friends and family to crowd-surf my coffin to a Skindred track. Here’s Newport’s finest at The Tramshed. I’m in the middle at the back on the balcony. Can you see me? 😀

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the antique taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these vintage artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left to see the complete image.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

Weird Angles

9 Oct

Here’s a recent life drawing which is quite academic in the way I approached it. Our model was standing on a low table and I was sitting on a chair looking up slightly so I got to draw from an interesting but weird angle, and I needed to make sure I had the proportions and perspective accurate. In 30 minutes. No pressure then 😀

Here’s a 10 minute pose, one of the shorter ones at the start of the session, for us to warm up. Our model has been doing yoga for many years and held her pose comfortably. Another weird angle and it was quite difficult to draw.

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the antique taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these vintage artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left to see the complete image.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

Bruised, Sore And Hoarse. Marvellous!

8 Oct

Didn’t post here last night because I was AT A GIG – Skindred – for the first time since lockdown started. That’s 18 months without live music. It was BRILLIANT but I’m absolutely knackered today. My feet feel bruised, my neck is sore from headbanging and I can hardly speak because I screamed myself hoarse. Bloody marvellous. I didn’t realised how much I missed live music. I feel ALIVE!!!!!

I managed some scribbling during the set of the excellent first band, Saint Agnes. I was speed drawing in the dark – I like a challenge 😉 I often do technical drawing exercises, to practice, and the ones that helped most here are the one where you draw without looking at the paper at all, just the subject. And continuous line drawing.

The venue, The Tramshed in Cardiff, is proper old school with plenty of room for a mosh pit and carpets that your feet stick to 😀 I’m surprised I lasted the night, but two pints of Diet Coke and I was well away! But I’m suffering for it tonight so I made comfort food for me and Husb. Traditional rice pudding and a night in front of the telly. Lovely.

The main band was Skindred , Newport’s finest, and if you haven’t heard them, here’s a video of them at Download festival. They’re Welsh heavy metal / ragga fusion. I love them, one of my favourite bands.

Marks Of A Life Lived

6 Oct

Here’s the long pose from the most recent life drawing session. I had a good viewing position, with some great foreshortening on that right leg. I love foreshortening. It drives me nuts when I’m doing it but I enjoy a challenge! Our model bears the marks of a life lived on her body, with a voluptuousness that comes with age and the scar of cancer surgery. These make her more fascinating to draw as they challenge our society’s tiresome obsession about youth and alleged “perfection”, which gets boring to be honest.

Having an hour gave me the chance to do some work on the gorgeous quilt that our model brings with her. It’s nice to have that contrast to the colour and texture of her flesh, the natural and the manufactured. And I’ve always been a bit of a sucker for a paisley design.

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left and to see the complete image.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

Recycle and Draw

5 Oct

For this life drawing I recycled a drawing I’d done before that I wasn’t happy with, done with my home-made walnut ink and a dip pen. It just didn’t work out so, waste not, want not. Because I was working on top of existing lines, I relaxed and let myself go a bit, didn’t get too academic about it and I really like the result. I did this in about 30 minutes. The one below is a 20 minute pose and I used a more traditional approach to it.

%d bloggers like this: