Tag Archives: foreshortening

Silhouette

8 Jan

This is the second of a series of sketches I’m doing from photos I took of the war memorial in Kendal in the Lake District a few months ago. It was a bright day so the statue was silhouetted against the sky, wiping out any details on the statue. I’m using a ballpoint pen into an A6 hardbound sketchbook and making a lot of use of cross hatching.

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the antique taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these vintage artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

Foreshortening And Mark Making

7 Jan

I saw a bronze sculpture of a World War 1 soldier on a memorial in Kendal in the Lake District. He was on a tall plinth and towered above me at an interesting angle, so I took a few photos from different sides and then completely forgot about them until I was browsing today and thought, “Ah! I was going to do some sketches from these. Good foreshortening”. So I had a scribble, I’ll do a few more. It’s good practice to draw from a different viewpoint and to scribble lots of marks too.

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the antique taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these vintage artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

Marks Of A Life Lived

6 Oct

Here’s the long pose from the most recent life drawing session. I had a good viewing position, with some great foreshortening on that right leg. I love foreshortening. It drives me nuts when I’m doing it but I enjoy a challenge! Our model bears the marks of a life lived on her body, with a voluptuousness that comes with age and the scar of cancer surgery. These make her more fascinating to draw as they challenge our society’s tiresome obsession about youth and alleged “perfection”, which gets boring to be honest.

Having an hour gave me the chance to do some work on the gorgeous quilt that our model brings with her. It’s nice to have that contrast to the colour and texture of her flesh, the natural and the manufactured. And I’ve always been a bit of a sucker for a paisley design.

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left and to see the complete image.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

Like Marmite ….

25 Jul

These reclining poses are like Marmite in our Thursday night life drawing sessions at Swansea Print Workshop. People love ’em or hate ’em. Personally I can’t get enough of ’em, I love the foreshortening, I’m a glutton for punishment. I used Daler Rowney artist’s soft pastels for this 30 minute drawing, onto a heavy vintage paper.

This one below is a 10 minute pose, drawn with conte crayon. I’m not happy with it, it’s out of proportion and it shouldn’t be – I had enough time to check it but it still went wrong. Oh well, it happens.

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left and to see the complete image.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

Wicked Foreshortening

16 Jun

Here’s a reclining pose from last week’s life drawing session at Swansea Print Workshop. It’s got wicked foreshortening, which I love but I think it’s really hard to draw. I used white, sanguine and black conte crayons onto a lovely soft, textured vintage black paper. It was given to me by a friend from the studio of his late father and there’s no watermark so I don’t know the make. Pity, it’s gorgeous and I’d love to buy more.

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left and to see the complete image.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

I Like A Challenge

3 Jun

I love to draw reclining poses, I’m a bit of a glutton for punishment and I like the challenge of foreshortening. This one was challenging! I think I’m going to work on this with acrylic paints and really make a feature of the patterned throw.

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left and to see the complete image.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

Brain vs Eye

15 Oct

Zoo lab 3

The Skull On The Wall

I spent an hour sketching in the Zoology Museum at Swansea University this evening. There was this big skull high up on the wall, with HUGE horns. I have no idea what it is, I was so engrossed that I didn’t think to find out it’s name. I started with a quick warm-up sketch, using the blind continuous line technique, looking at the subject rather than the paper and keeping my pen on the paper at all times.

 

Zoo lab 2

 

Drastic!

It was mounted high on the wall so I pulled a chair under it and drew it from below, an unusual angle and one that would give me a bit of a challenge. Well, that was an understatement! The thing is that our brains adjust what we see all the time. The brain often overrides the eyes, making us see what we think we see, not necessarily what’s there in front of us. Especially with some drastic foreshortening like I had here. It was tough to draw, I had to keep telling myself “draw what’s there, not what you think is there”.

 

Zoo lab 1

Apart from the crazy foreshortening, I had trouble drawing the bit where the skull joins the horn so I did a little study of that bit, to analyse and understand it.

 

 

I’m currently artist in residence with the FIRE Laboratory in the Department of Bioscience at Swansea University. It’s great to have access to facilities like this little museum.

Resting On My Knee

26 Aug

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This is the eleventh of my “Up Yer Nose” series of digital drawings. I start by taking a digital photo of my victims …. er …. volunteers …. then I look at the photo on my phone, resting on my knee, while I draw freehand into my Samsung Galaxy Note 8 using a free Markers app. I don’t download the photo into the app and then draw on top. I tried that once, years ago, and it looks weird. It takes away my interpretation and my style and just looks fake. And it doesn’t really teach me anything or give me valid practice. Drawing from scratch takes a lot longer but it’s more satisfying and I prefer the result.

 

 

Up Yer Furry Nose

19 Aug

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Greetings Hairless Apes. Sparta Puss here. My trained monkeys have left the pooter box unattended so I thought I’d give you the benefit of my wisdom. Even though I know it won’t be of much use, you’re just a bunch of simians, after all.

The idiot she-monkey, the one who does the scribbling, has been doing drawings of other monkeys, but at an odd position, up their noses. That’s how I see you lot most of the time, so it’s not odd to me. So she just did this one of me. I must say, I look much better from this angle than you bald monkeys. Here are the other ones she’s done so far, the ginger one’s making a decent attempt at growing fur….

Drawn with a Samsung Galaxy Note 8 using a free Markers app.

 

 

A Fleeting Moment

16 Aug

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Our facial expressions are generally made up of continuous movements and a photograph captures just one fleeting moment amongst many. So when you base a drawing on a photograph, the image might look a bit odd, or not like the person normally looks. I’m pushing this by taking photos of people with their heads thrown back, up their noses, but this one has a great big laugh to draw as well.

I d took the digital photo on my phone and then I drew from it, using a Samsung Galaxy Note 8 using a free Markers app. I laid down a beige ground and worked on top. I mislaid the stylus half way through and had to continue with my fingers, which made it quite spotty.

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