Tag Archives: masterpieces

A Head Start And Recycling Waste

16 Sep

I was never much of a fan of the 18th / 19th century British landscape painter John Constable. I grew up in a time when his work was popular on biscuit tins and chocolate boxes and I guess that familiarity breeds contempt. So copying this cloud study with Ed Sumner’s Cheese and Wine Painting Club was a real eye-opener. Constable made about 50 spectacular oil sketches of clouds in 1821 – 1822. He was very scientific in his approach and wrote notes on the back of the paintings about the conditions, the light and time of day; he was influenced by the pioneering “Father of Meteorology”, Luke Howard. 

I started the painting on a textured canvas. I don’t like to waste anything so when I have some paint left over at the end of a session I scrape it onto a spare canvas and over the weeks it builds up layers of colour and texture. When I want to use it, I paint over it with some white acrylic or whatever colour is going to be the base coat of the painting. It gives me a head start on a heavily textured work like this one …. and I recycle paint I would otherwise have thrown away.

I’ve painted this with Liquitex Heavy Body acrylic paints onto stretched canvas and I’m offering it for sale to raise money for LATCH: The Children’s Cancer Charity. To find out more, and see a short time-lapse film of me painting “Cloud Study”, please click on the painting below.

LATCH, The Children’s Cancer Charity, Painting Fundraiser

I’ve been painting these ‘fakes’ with Ed Sumner’s Cheese and Wine Painting Club on Facebook since lockdown started in Spring 2020. I’m selling some of them to raise funds for this lovely charity which has given so much support to my young relative over the past few years.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is boats-at-arles-small.jpg

If you would like to see the paintings and maybe buy one, please click on the boats picture to visit the page. Thanks xxx

The Other Wild Beast

15 Sep

This painting is a copy of “Charing Cross Bridge” by the French artist Andre Derain, who was most famous for being one of Les Fauves – Wild Beasts – a group of painters who developed this style in the first decade of the 20th century. As well as Derain, the group included most famously Henri Matisse and the two are generally recognised as the leaders of Les Fauves. This is one of 30 paintings that Derain did as a young man when he lived in London around 1906 and is full of joyous colour and dynamic brushstrokes, in marked contrast to his later art, after World War One, which is sober and classical.

I loved painting this. Apart from the juicy colours, the composition reminds me of photographs from around this time. They’d have been in black and white, of course, but the wider angle shots also have that strange distorted perspective that you can see here, especially in the moving vehicles. It fascinates me that both photography and cars were reasonably new things, this is the start of our modern world, saturated in unrealistic colours and warped by new technology. I’ve painted this with Liquitex Heavy Body acrylic paints onto stretched canvas and I’m offering it for sale to raise money for LATCH: The Children’s Cancer Charity. To fond out more, and see a short time-lapse film of me painting “Charing Cross Bridge”, please click on the painting below.

LATCH, The Children’s Cancer Charity, Painting Fundraiser

I’ve been painting these ‘fakes’ with Ed Sumner’s Cheese and Wine Painting Club on Facebook since lockdown started in Spring 2020. I’m selling some of them to raise funds for this lovely charity which has given so much support to my young relative over the past few years.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is boats-at-arles-small.jpg

If you would like to see the paintings and maybe buy one, please click on the boats picture to visit the page. Thanks xxx

The Brothers In Montmartre

14 Sep

This is a painting copy I have done of one of van Gogh’s scenes of Montmartre. Vincent was living with his brother Theo in 1886 when he painted this, when the area was still very rural. It’s not like that anymore, although there’s a windmill, the Moulin Rouge, and a few vineyards. But back when Vincent and Theo lived there, it was a largely unspoilt pastoral district and Vincent painted a series of scenes in this suburb. These studies still have the sombre feel of his earlier paintings from The Netherlands and Belgium. But within a year or so, his style had developed into the brightly coloured post-Impressionism most of us are familiar with.

The windmill here, “Moulin da la Galette”, built in 1622, is apparently still standing, just around the corner from the apartment the two brothers shared. Although this is an early work, his style of painting is just as complex as his later ones, with hundreds, maybe thousands, of brushstrokes overlaid and overlaid to build up rich textures and well as glorious depths of colour. It took me AGES to do all those sticks!!!!! I’m offering this work for sale to raise money for LATCH: The Children’s Cancer Charity, please click on the link below to find out more and also to see a time-lapse film of me painting it.

LATCH, The Children’s Cancer Charity, Painting Fundraiser

I’ve been painting these ‘fakes’ with Ed Sumner’s Cheese and Wine Painting Club on Facebook since lockdown started in Spring 2020. I’m selling some of them to raise funds for this lovely charity which has given so much support to my young relative over the past few years.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is boats-at-arles-small.jpg

If you would like to see the paintings and maybe buy one, please click on the boats picture to visit the page. Thanks xxx

The Green Lady And The King Of Kitsch

13 Sep

This is my painting copy of the famous work “Green Lady (Chinese Girl)” by the 20th century Russian-born painter Vladimir Tretchikoff. It’s an image I grew up with as so many people had a print of this on their living room walls during the 1960s and 1970s – it was one of the best selling art prints of the last century. Tretchikoff painted it in 1952 when the model, South African Monika Sing Lee was about 17 years old. She had never thought of herself as beautiful because of the racist remarks she endured in a society riddled with Apartheid and sadly never benefitted from the sale of millions of prints of the painting. She earned just £6 for sitting for the portrait. Tretchikoff was self-taught and his work was incredibly popular with the public, but earned him the title “The King Of Kitsch” from the art establishment. He sold so many reproductions of his works that he was reckoned to be the second richest artist of his time after Pablo Picasso.

I painted this copy during one of painter Ed Sumner’s Cheese and Wine Painting Club sessions on Facebook. Ed started the weekly club to give people something to do when the Covid19 lockdown started in March 2020 and it’s been so popular that it’s still carrying on. I used Liquitex Heavy Body acrylic paint onto stretched canvas. I found this one of the easier “fakes” over the past 18 months, the composition is fairly simple and the brushwork isn’t complex, unlike some of the other painters I’ve studied. The colours in her face are beautiful, such a range of tones and hues. I used a copper metallic paint in places to give her skin an iridescent sheen.

I’ve decided to sell this to raise money for LATCH: The Children’s Cancer Charity that has supported my young nephew and our family through the past few years. It’s an amazing charity and a cause very close to my heart. Please click on the photo below if you’d like to see more of this, including a time lapse film of me painting it, and the other paintings I’ve put up for sale to support LATCH.

LATCH, The Children’s Cancer Charity, Painting Fundraiser

I’ve been painting these ‘fakes’ with Ed Sumner’s Cheese and Wine Painting Club on Facebook since lockdown started in Spring 2020. I’m selling some of them to raise funds for this lovely charity which has given so much support to my young relative over the past few years.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is boats-at-arles-small.jpg

If you would like to see the paintings and maybe buy one, please click on the boats picture to visit the page. Thanks xxx

Turner Was A Cheapskate (And He Loved Cats)

11 Sep

The artist JMW Turner was a cheapskate. It’s true. He often used cheap paints and sometimes they were so cheap that buyers returned the work months later because they had faded so much! He loved the juicy red called cochineal, made from South American beetles. But despite knowing that the colour just wouldn’t last, he carried on using it and we have no idea after a couple of centuries just how brilliantly coloured his original works were.

Turner was known for not caring about his finished work and left a lot of paintings in terrible conditions. He even ripped a tear in one painting to make a flap for his seven Manx cats.  He was such a passionate, spontaneous artist that he wanted the reddest red at the moment he was painting and didn’t think of anything else. 

I copied this painting by Turner “Storm At Sea” during one of Ed Sumner’s Cheese and Wine Painting Club sessions on Facebook. He’s been running them since the start of the Covid19 lockdown back in March 2020. It’s built up of many textured layers of paint. His work is so complex, with so many things going on and I’ve learnt a lot by copying him. And I’ve used excellent paint, Liquitex Heavy Body acrylic, so it won’t fade LOL 😀

I’m selling it to raise money for LATCH The Children’s Cancer Charity, which is a wonderful organisation supporting very ill children and their families. Please click on the painting of the boats below to have a look at all the paintings I’m selling for LATCH xxx

LATCH, The Children’s Cancer Charity, Painting Fundraiser

I’ve been painting these ‘fakes’ with Ed Sumner’s Cheese and Wine Painting Club on Facebook since lockdown started in Spring 2020. I’m selling some of them to raise funds for this lovely charity which has given so much support to my young relative over the past few years.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is boats-at-arles-small.jpg

If you would like to see the paintings and maybe buy one, please click on the boats picture to visit the page. Thanks xxx

Sinuous Not Clunky

10 Sep

Back to faking with Ed Sumner’s Cheese and Wine Painting Club over on Facebook and this week it’s an early painting by the Dutch artist Piet Mondrian, “Evening; Red Tree”. I’d only known Mondrian’s later works before, which are very controlled and geometric so it was a surprise to see this one from around 1908 when he was working in the Post-Impressionist style. This tree is starting to edge towards abstraction though and moving in the direction of his later restricted Red / Blue palette.

It wasn’t easy to be honest. I struggled with it and didn’t think I was getting anywhere until the very last layer of paint when I did a second coat of blue over the original. And then it sort of made sense, it became almost like a stained glass window and very sinuous instead of just clunky.

LATCH, The Children’s Cancer Charity, Painting Fundraiser

I’ve been painting these ‘fakes’ with Ed Sumner’s Cheese and Wine Painting Club on Facebook since lockdown started in Spring 2020. I’m selling some of them to raise funds for this lovely charity which has given so much support to my young relative over the past few years.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is boats-at-arles-small.jpg

If you would like to see the paintings and maybe buy one, please click on the boats picture to visit the page. Thanks xxx

Blobby Purpley Swirls

9 Sep

Vincent van Gogh painted lots of flowers, tons of them. Here’s a close up of one of the irises I copied recently during The Cheese and Wine Painting Club on Facebook. Ed Sumner, who runs the club, taught us to paint these by doing a sort of swirl in one stroke with a big brush and dark purpley blue acrylic paint and then add the lighter bits and details when it had dried. It was fun, to be honest, doing a canvas full of these purpley swirls.

This is the full painting and it’s part of my fundraiser for LATCH, The Children’s Cancer Charity that I’m running through September. It’s a wonderful charity that’s given so much support to a young relative over the past few years. Please click on the link below and take a look – there are more of my copies and something about LATCH and the work they do xxx

LATCH, The Children’s Cancer Charity, Painting Fundraiser

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is boats-at-arles-small.jpg

If you would like to see the paintings and maybe buy one, please click on the boats picture to visit the page. Thanks xxx



Sticking Up In Little Spikes….

8 Sep

Here’s a little bit of a van Gogh sunflower from the copy I painted in one of Ed Sumner’s Cheese and Wine Painting Clubs on Facebook. I’m selling the painting to raise funds for LATCH, The Children’s Cancer Charity which has given fantastic support to a young relative over the past few years and helped our family through the darkest of times. It’s a small charity entirely dependent on fundraising and goodwill. Please take a look at the fundraising page (link at bottom) and find out a bit more about LATCH xxxx

It is said that van Gogh’s many paintings of sunflowers were originally much brighter, but he often could only afford cheaper paints and the yellows in particular are supposed to have changed over the years, becoming darker and more browny. I’ve painted this in Liquitex Heavy Body acrylic paints, top quality artist pigments that will remain true for a lifetime if looked after properly. Copying a painting teaches you so much about the technique of the original artist. I’ve learnt that van Gogh built up the paintings in many, many layers, more than I had imagined. Those weird sunflowers at the bottom of the vase in particular, are painted so thickly that the paint is sticking up in little spikes. Wouldn’t it be great to travel back in a time machine and see them as they were created?

LATCH, The Children’s Cancer Charity, Painting Fundraiser

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is boats-at-arles-small.jpg

If you would like to see the paintings and maybe buy one, please click on the boats picture to visit the page. Thanks xxx



Just A Reminder

7 Sep

Just a reminder that this is one of my “fake” masterpieces that I’ve put up for sale to support LATCH The Children’s Cancer Charity that has given so much support to a young relative over the past few years. This is a copy of one of John Constable’s study of clouds, he did lots. I’ve used Liquitex acrylic paints onto a primed, stretched canvas.

LATCH, The Children’s Cancer Charity, Painting Fundraiser

I’ve been painting ‘fakes’ with Ed Sumner’s Cheese and Wine Painting Club on Facebook since lockdown started in Spring 2020. I’m selling some of them to raise funds for this lovely charity which has given so much support to my young relative over the past few years.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is boats-at-arles-small.jpg

If you would like to see the paintings and maybe buy one, please click on the boats picture to visit the page. Thanks xxx



Another One Gone!

6 Sep

See this van Gogh painted in a minute!!!! 😀

Thrilled to bits that this copy I painted of van Gogh’s “Sunset at Wheatfield Near Arles” has been sold for my fundraiser for LATCH, The Children’s Cancer Charity. It’s one of nearly 60 paintings I have done since the start of the pandemic lockdown early last year with Ed Sumner’s Cheese and Wine Painting Club on Facebook. I am selling a selection of them to raise money for LATCH, which has given so much support to a young relative and our family for the past three years.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is boats-at-arles-small.jpg

If you would like to see the paintings and maybe buy one, please click on the boats picture to visit the page. Thanks xxx



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