Tag Archives: Storm at Sea

Turner Was A Cheapskate (And He Loved Cats)

11 Sep

The artist JMW Turner was a cheapskate. It’s true. He often used cheap paints and sometimes they were so cheap that buyers returned the work months later because they had faded so much! He loved the juicy red called cochineal, made from South American beetles. But despite knowing that the colour just wouldn’t last, he carried on using it and we have no idea after a couple of centuries just how brilliantly coloured his original works were.

Turner was known for not caring about his finished work and left a lot of paintings in terrible conditions. He even ripped a tear in one painting to make a flap for his seven Manx cats.  He was such a passionate, spontaneous artist that he wanted the reddest red at the moment he was painting and didn’t think of anything else. 

I copied this painting by Turner “Storm At Sea” during one of Ed Sumner’s Cheese and Wine Painting Club sessions on Facebook. He’s been running them since the start of the Covid19 lockdown back in March 2020. It’s built up of many textured layers of paint. His work is so complex, with so many things going on and I’ve learnt a lot by copying him. And I’ve used excellent paint, Liquitex Heavy Body acrylic, so it won’t fade LOL 😀

I’m selling it to raise money for LATCH The Children’s Cancer Charity, which is a wonderful organisation supporting very ill children and their families. Please click on the painting of the boats below to have a look at all the paintings I’m selling for LATCH xxx

LATCH, The Children’s Cancer Charity, Painting Fundraiser

I’ve been painting these ‘fakes’ with Ed Sumner’s Cheese and Wine Painting Club on Facebook since lockdown started in Spring 2020. I’m selling some of them to raise funds for this lovely charity which has given so much support to my young relative over the past few years.

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If you would like to see the paintings and maybe buy one, please click on the boats picture to visit the page. Thanks xxx

Timelapse Turner

21 Mar

I recently finished faking a painting by JMW Turner, “Storm at Sea” and Husb made a timelapse video of me doing it. Here it is if you fancy seeing how it developed. I’ve been faking more or less every Friday throughout the pandemic lockdown, almost a year now, with Ed Sumner’s Cheese and Wine Painting Club on Facebook.

 

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left and to see the complete image.

Inspired by drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artefacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

Finally Finished Faffing

11 Mar

Storm at Sea by JMW Turner. I think this is the hardest painting I have copied since I joined Ed Sumner’s Cheese and Wine Painting Club almost a year ago now. I’ve done almost 40 and I’ve learnt so much from copying such a range of artists, but Turner has definitely been the most difficult for me. But probably the one I’ve learnt the most from as well. The complexity of his technique is staggering. They look simple but they’re definitely not.

Here are the stages of the painting. I nearly gave up about half way through, I wanted to paint the whole thing white and recycle the canvas, but I persevered when I realised that I needed to put masses more paint onto it. The real breakthrough came when I tried dabbing thick paint impasto style with the blunt end of a square brush. Something very specific, but it transformed the whole thing.

 

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left and to see the complete image.

Inspired by drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artefacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

Layers Of Faff

10 Mar

I’m still working on the fake JMW Turner painting, “Storm at Sea”, building layer upon layer, knocking the colour back with thin glazes of watery white and rubbing through to reveal some of the delicate colours beneath, all overlaid with thick gobbets of paint piling texture onto the surface of the canvas. All a bit of a faff but when you see his work in galleries, you realise how much paint has gone into – or onto – them. I started this last Friday at the Cheese and Wine Painting Club over on Facebook. Run by the painter Ed Turner, we copy a painting by a famous artist every week. The sessions are free or a donation for those who can afford it, and Ed’s been running them for almost a year now, to help us get through lockdown. Come and have a look 🙂

 

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left and to see the complete image.

Inspired by drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artefacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

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