The One Full Hour

17 Jun

We have a tea break half way through the 3 hour life drawing session at Swansea Print Workshop. Before the break we do a series of short poses but then in the second half we have just one full-hour pose. I have mixed feelings about these. There’s a lot to be said for having some time to work on measurement and detail but these longer poses lose the immediacy of the quicker drawings. I used black, sanguine and white conte crayon onto a heavy textured black vintage paper.

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left and to see the complete image.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

5 Responses to “The One Full Hour”

  1. Leonie Andrews June 18, 2021 at 12:27 #

    I’m with you about super long poses. I draw what I want in about 30 mins max, generally less, then muck around aimlessly making it worse in the remaining time. We did a workshop with Australian portrait artists Nicholas Harding earlier this year – it was interesting to see him, using charcoal, draw and re-draw the model, changing bits and pieces, but never totally erasing what he had done. He got quite refined on the face .

    • Rosie Scribblah June 21, 2021 at 14:22 #

      Sounds like a fabulous experience, Leonie

      • Leonie Andrews June 21, 2021 at 14:42 #

        It certainly was. Although for some time it looked like we were all just going to stand there watching him, instead of doing our own work.😄😄😄

  2. Lois June 17, 2021 at 23:13 #

    Gosh this is stunning! The pose seems so relaxed, almost passive, and yet there’s enormous strength in the figure.

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