Tag Archives: Mangalitza pigs

Twijazzling And Sheeptacular

31 Jul

lino arthur

The Royal Welsh Show was on last week, the biggest annual agricultural show in Wales. I’ve been a couple of times but I find it a bit odd because I’m a proper townie. A while back, I visited some chums who raise pigs, in very nice humane conditions, and did some scribbling. One of my sketches became this lino cut of their Mangalitza Boar. Here’s their website, it’s very interesting but perhaps best avoided if you’re vegetarian or vegan.

There’s a new online publication called The Eye Magazine all about life in Wales. I spotted this article, a spoof about the Royal Welsh Show. It’s hilarious. Seriously funny. Take a few minutes to read it, it’s only short. It’s called “Twijazzling Furore At The Royal Welsh“. Twijazzling is such a bonkers concept I wouldn’t be surprised if it takes off. Do watch the “Welsh Sheeptacular” video in the article. It’s genius!

 

Pressing The Piggah!

24 Apr

23 press

I spent the afternoon at Swansea Print Workshop, inking and pressing a little lino block I’d cut earlier this week. The subject is Arthur, the Mangalitza boar from Pontyates. I forgot to take my digital camera so tried using the camera on my phone. It’s rubbish and really complicated to get the image onto my computer, involving something called Blueray, Husb’s smartphone and emails. I won’t bother again. Anyway, here’s a blurry picture of the magnificent Colombian Press, dating from 1855, with the inked block ready to go.

24 arthur

I’m just in the proofing phase at the moment, tryng out different papers, inks and pressures on the Colombian. This one is printed using Intaglio Printmakers Velvet Black litho ink (oil-based) onto a very white, lightweight Japanese hand-made paper.

Cutting The Pig

19 Apr

19 piggah block

I haven’t been able to settle down to work on my large pieces of art because of this darn lurgi. So today I grabbed a little bit of lino, transferred a sketchbook drawing I made at the weekend of Arthur the Mangalitza boar and cut away. I’ll print the block in black next week.

The Final Piggahs

16 Apr

16 piggahs 1

Here are the last of my scribblings of pigs down on the farm in Pontyates. Some more drawings of Arthur and Mango, two of the Mangalitza pigs; Mangalica in it’s native Hungarian, one of three breeds of curly-haired hog originally bred in Hungary.

16 piggahs 2

There is a third Mangalitsa, a ginger sow called Lisa, but she was too shy to come and see us. They’ve only been in Britain for about six or seven years so I was lucky to be able to see some. Arthur and Mango were very engrossed in scoffing their hay and barley at first, but became a bit friendlier. They’re pretty large beasts and sometimes jump the fence and go for a wander.

16 piggahs 3

Arthur got quite vocal too with a surprisingly loud, gruff voice. The Mangalitza’s legs are much bigger and stockier than those of the dainty little Berkshire piggies that also live on the farm. Nice for juicy ham! As well as doing some drypoint etchings from these scribbles, I’m also tempted to do some tiny linocuts.

More Pontyates Piggahs

15 Apr

15 piggahs 3

Husb and I visited some friends on a small farm in Pontyates yesterday and I drew their pigs. They have three Mangalitzas billeted in their woodland, two of them showed up for their barley and hay snackage; the ginger one was shy and stayed away. I scribbled the other two who are very different to the little Berkshires I blogged yesterday. They’re much bigger and very, very hairy. One of them was positively curly! This made it harder to draw any detail on them but they lent themselves to my very scribbly style.

15 piggahs 2

Pontyates is a small Welsh-speaking village West of Llanelli with a fish and chip shop. Dot Cotton, from East Enders, was evacuated to Pontyates during the war and one of its most famous daughters is Mandy Rice-Davies who was involved in the Profumo scandal.

15 piggahs 1

These Mangalitzas are European curly-haired hogs, descended from wild boar and mainly kept for lard. But because people aren’t so keen on lard anymore, they’re now classified as a rare breed. Bring back Lardy Cake, I say! These are destined to be little tiny drypoint etchings, scribbled into paper drypoint plates.

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