Painting Gold And Copper

8 Nov

Klimt 4

I did some more work on my copy of Gustav Klimt’s “Woman In Gold” today. I started it mid week on a Zoom painting tutorial with painter Ed Sumner who runs the Friday lunchtime Cheese and Wine Painting Club on Facebook. My #lockdown2020 challenge is to improve my painting skills and I’m learning loads. I think this is the 23rd painting I’ve copied since April, using Liquitex Heavy Body acrylic paints and Daler Rowney brushes for acrylics. I’m trying out the metallic ones in gold and copper.

Klimt 4a

It’s so interesting to study another artist’s techniques. Klimt’s composition is quite simple, the portrait sublime and everything else is playing with patterns. It’s a good exercise in using paint and brushes in different ways too. Sometimes I’m using them like watercolours, thin and fine, then I’m stippling with the flat end of a brush and fairly thick paint – like Bob Ross does his happy little trees. Then I’m using a ‘dry brush’ technique, dragging small amounts of paint across the canvas surface, depositing a tiny amount, almost imperceptible. It’s all good practice.

If you want to join in with the painting club, check it out here, the next one is a Rousseau. The Friday lunchtime sessions are free if you don’t have much to spare, or a donation if you can afford to. People join in from all over the world, all ages, and it’s good fun as well as learning a lot.

 

 

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left and to see the complete image.

Inspired by drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artefacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

2 Responses to “Painting Gold And Copper”

  1. Helen Cherry November 9, 2020 at 07:31 #

    Wonderful and one of my favourite art works.

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