Tag Archives: paper

A Bit Of Vintage

29 Apr

18 Kathe vintage

And ….. back to my experiments with home-made printing ink. After disappointing results with a lightweight Japanese Hosho paper, I tried a lovely vintage British paper, J Green & Sons sold by the Vintage Paper Co. Above, I used the ink with a rubber stamp made from a design I did of the artist Käthe Kollwitz, applied with a roller (brayer) and stamped by hand. On the left is a slightly dampened paper, spritzed on the back with a water spray bottle. On the right is one onto dry paper. The damp one is the best.

17 Frida vintage

Then I tried the ink with a vinyl block based on a screenprint I did of artist Frida Kahlo, applied with a roller and the print taken using a traditional Japanese bamboo baren. Again, the print onto dampened paper (right) is better than the one on dry (left). Pretty good results but still one more paper to try. More tomorrow ……..

 

 

I have put my series of drawings en plein air of ancient Welsh monuments on Artfinder.  If you want to see more, please click on the image below or the Artfinder link at the top right of this page. This one is the legendary grave of Saint Elfys (Elvis) in Pembrokeshire, not for from the Presceli Mountains. Elfys? Presceli? Elvis Presley? Coincidence? hhhmmmm

St Elvis

Three Papers

16 Nov

kollwitz-nettle

A while back, I did some drawings of artists who inspire me and from those drawings I made some silkscreen stencils and printed up a series of nine images. Then I scanned a couple of those screenprints and had them made into small rubber stamps and that’s what I’m working with now, experimenting and seeing what I can come up with. A few weeks ago I went to a short paper-making course at Swansea’s City Farm and the paper, although lovely, isn’t particularly good for drawing so I’ve been trying to come up with some uses for it. So here’s a mashup of a little stamp of Käthe Kollwitz on Japanese Shiohara paper set onto a piece of hand made nettle paper mounted onto Daler Rowney Ebony paper. Oooohhh three papers in one little piece. Lovely.

 

Stingys!

4 Oct

When I was a kid, we always called Stinging Nettles “Stingys”. I hated them because they always managed to find me and sting me. I also have unhappy memories of my younger years as a biker chick, looking for somewhere to wee in the middle of a field at night at a bike rally and ending up with red and sore nether regions because I couldn’t see Stingys in the dark. In recent years, as an allotmenteer, I began to appreciate them for the nutrient rich liquid manure made by steeping them in a bin of water – one of the foulest smells ever but good for the plants. And this evening I discovered another use for them – hand made paper.

I went to a short evening workshop at Swansea’s Community Farm led by local papermaker Bryan Collis. The workers and children at the Farm harvested sackfuls of nettles for Bryan to turn into pulp and then to paper. Luckily for us, Bryan had removed the ‘stingy’ from the nettles before we got our hands on them. The paper sheets I made will dry for a couple of days between boards before I get to use them.

 

There’s more of my art to be seen in my online Gallery in Artfinder, please click on the image below to take a look. Thank you.

Quoit

 

 

Walnuts And Mud

2 Mar

fieldstone 1

My journey around ancient monuments last week ended is an unbelievably muddy field just outside the tiny village of Meinciau in Carmarthenshire. Some distance from the road, through a couple of fields is The Gwempa standing stone, a large menhir covered in elaborate patterns of lichen and scored heavily with lines near the bottom. The word menhir is often used to describe a standing stone and it is just one letter away from the Welsh ‘maen hir‘ which translates as long stone.

catacomb

I’ve been experimenting with the paper I’ve been using on these drawing trips. I prefer not to work directly onto white and I’ve marbled a lot of pieces with black oil paint. I’ve also been using a black sketchbook (Daler Rowney ‘Ebony’) but I also had a large piece of Fabriano that I’d used for a walnut ink drawing based on St. Paul’s Catacombs in Malta. I made a batch of walnut ink a while back and it’s absolutely gorgeous to use. Click here for the method. I didn’t much like the drawing of the catacombs though, so I ripped it in two and used a piece for the drawing of the Gwempa stone; I drew with black carbon and white conte crayon. I really like the effect of the textured and patterned walnut ink underneath the drawing. It’s quite random but I think it works.

fieldstone 2

I’m travelling around with archaeologist Dewi Bowen who is researching his new book. His previous book on the standing stones of Ancient Siluria (South East Wales) can be found here. Accompanying us is film maker Melvyn Williams who is recording a documentary about the process. Some of Melvyn’s short films can be seen here. If you want to see some galleries of my artworks, please click here.

Little Lovely Leftovers

22 Feb

leftovers

Just finished stitching a set of 15 little prints for the Leftovers VI international print exchange organised by the irrepressible Amy Nack at Wingtip Press in Boise, Idaho, USA. The premise of Leftovers is to use up some of those scraps of beautiful printmaking papers that are often left over from our projects. I have put together an edition of 15 little rubber stamp prints that I developed from an original screenprint. I printed them onto fragments of Japanese Shiohara paper and then stitched them onto leftover pieces of Somerset, using my antique Singer sewing machine. Artists from all over the world participate in this each year and Amy puts together a touring exhibition of each year’s Leftovers that travels the globe. If you’re quick, there’s still time to enter.

Loosening Up

27 Jun

tiny drawings

I carried on working on tiny recycled fragments of beautiful papers today, Somerset, Bockingford, BFK Rives, Hahnemulle, and found myself relaxing into it. Yesterday was frustrating and difficult, as it should be, I was trying something new and there’s no reason why it should be easy.

Today I was much less prissy and precious about what I was doing on the paper. At the end of the day it’s just a fragment of paper and if I don’t like what I have done, I can gesso over it. In fact I did that to a couple that I had worked on yesterday anyway.

All the pieces of paper are size A6 or smaller and I have been working on them with gesso, willow charcoal, carbon, graphite, Indian ink wash, home made walnut ink, conte crayon using brushes, fingers, wet wipes and cotton buds to blend and fade the marks.

Tiny Fragments

26 Jun

wpid-20150626_194238.jpg

 

Trying something different today. Normally I work directly from life but I started drawing intuitively, using tiny fragments of lovely papers. Most of them had been prints that hadn’t worked out so I am recycling them. I don’t know where it will lead but that’s what doing art is about, constantly pushing and trying to do new things. I’ve made a start on these little papers and I will carry on working on them tomorrow.  If they don’t work out, I can gesso over them and start again.

See How It Goes

20 Jun

pastel nude

 

I’m going into a phase of experimentation for a while. I have been marbling some Fabriano Accademica paper with black oil pigment and turpentine and I left it out in the garden to dry out; it was quite smelly because of the turps. I forgot about it and it was out overnight and when I looked at it today, snails had attacked it, chewing out some small holes but also munching away at the surface, making it textured in places. Interesting.

I’ve been rooting through old sketchbooks, looking for drawings to work from and I quite like this simple one, done in an olive pastel at a life drawing session. I’ll use it as the basis for drawing onto the marbled paper, with different black and white media; graphite, willow charcoal, carbon, Bideford Black and oil pastel. And see how it goes…….

 

Waste Not, Want Not.

17 Jun

wpid-20150617_162951.jpg

 

So I was working with some fellow artists and one of them, a painter, chucked some black oil paint mixed with turps down the sink. Unfortunately, the sink was blocked so he filled it with water and squeezed some washing up liquid into it and suddenly it went all marbled. So, waste not, want not, I grabbed some of my Fabriano Accademica paper and threw it on top of the water and marbled my paper. It’s been sitting round for a few months and I’d just about forgotten about it until today, when I decided to do some drawing.

 

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I’ve been working on a series of silkscreen prints over the past few weeks, tight design and a very specific technical process and I wanted to get back to something intuitive, so I grabbed my marbled paper and various black drawing media: some willow charcoal, carbon, compressed charcoal and Bideford Black. And I got stuck in. I used an old life drawing very loosely as a basis and then got into the zone, moving the media across the paper, just letting it happen.

 

For The Love Of Paper

6 Jun

hannah

I’m cracking on with my silkscreens of women artists, completing another 2 editions today,  Hannah Höch, a Berlin Dadaist and pioneer of collage and photomontage and Gabriele Münter, a German Expressionist painter. I’m printing in editions of 25 and hope to complete eight editions to take to the London Art Car Boot Fair on June the 14th. These are numbers 4 and 5 of the final 8.

gabriele drying

I’m using Speedball Diazo Drawing Fluid to paint the image onto the screens and completing the stencil with their liquid filler. I have been using Daler Rowney System 3 acrylic process black pigment mixed with Screen Printing Medium in a ration of one third to two thirds, pigment to medium. I am printing on some beautiful handmade vintage paper by W.H. Saunders, a British mill that unfortunately no longer exists. It’s a medium weight, slightly textured creamy deckle-edged paper. Ooooh I love paper. I love it!

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