Tag Archives: automatic drawing

Marbling With The Surrealists

8 Sep

marbled paper small 4

 

This is a bit of experimentation I did, marbling some paper with black oil paint floated onto a bowl of water. I dipped a sheet of paper onto the surface of the paint and lifted it off and dried it. Then I used my imagination to see and draw shapes with compressed charcoal – a vaguely human image emerged. This spontaneous and imaginative approach was used extensively by the Surrealists in the early 20th century, as a way to loosen up creatively.

 

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

 

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

In this one, I combine some of the images with snippets of text of things my Nana used to say. She used to take me to Swansea Museum a lot when I was little and I could hear her voice in the back of my head as I was sitting and drawing the birds and bugs.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

 

 

Faces From The Dark

26 Jul

faces

I have some lovely vintage papers and I’m trying out different ways of using them. I used a silkscreen squeegee to randomly coat a few sheets with acrylic paint, firstly in black and when that was dry, overlaid with a translucent bronze. Then I sat and looked at a sheet with a piece of willow charcoal in my hand. I had no idea what to do, I sketched a few lines, rubbed them out with a wetwipe (the acrylic surface wipes clean) and then lightly sketched some ellipses. I picked up a piece of chalk and then the faces began to emerge out of the dark without my bidding.

I don’t normally work from my imagination, usually directly from life, from my sketchbooks and occasionally from photographs, so it’s interesting what emerges without any references. The preparation of the paper and the method of random drawing without a stimulus is a bit like some of the techniques of automatic drawing used by Surrealists to develop their creativity. The painter, Gerhard Richter, also used a squeegee extensively in his work, to apply paint. I like using the squeegee, it’s so random.

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