Tag Archives: vintage paper

Randomness. 2

9 May

d finish

I’m carrying on experimenting with being as random as I can, which isn’t easy for me! I worked on another sheet of vintage watercolour paper from a Winsor & Newton block I was given by a friend, it’s about size A2. I did one a few days ago and I think I’ll do a series and see what happens. I used my home-made walnut husk ink, firstly applying a light wash and when that was dry, brushing the neat ink over with a large, flat brush. I like the way the ink pools at the edge of the brushstrokes.

 

Here are the two that I’ve done so far. I don’t know what I might end up doing with them, at the moment I’m just trying to keep a open mind and be as free as possible.

e one and two

 

Vintage Paper And Liquid Silk

2 May

d second wash

Another development in my current phase of random experimentation. A dear friend has given me a lot of vintage art supplies, mostly lovely papers, and I’m putting them to good use. This is a large block of water colour paper, the kind that where all the sheets are stuck together which saves you from having to stretch individual pieces. It’s quite a big one, about 20 x 14 inches. I don’t usually use watercolour, especially on a large scale, so I watered down some of my home-made walnut ink and brushed it onto the paper, leaving it to dry overnight. Then I took some undiluted walnut ink, a rich chocolatey sepia that flows like liquid silk and poured some onto the paper.

 

At first I had a strong urge to try and make something representational, but I resisted that and brushed across the paper randomly, using a 2.5 inch household painting brush. The ink holds the impression of the brush, which I like. Once it’s dry. I’ll peel it off and have a think about what I will do with it. Probably something with conté crayon and/or soft pastels. Maybe even oil bars.

Please click here to find out how to make walnut ink.

Putting It Together

26 Aug

Making an artwork can sometimes be quick and spontaneous but is often a set of processes that finally come together. That’s the way I developed the collage that I made yesterday at the Mill Lane Arts Week in Cardiff. I rummaged around in my plans chest for old discarded prints that hadn’t worked out to my satisfaction, linocuts and screenprints, the paper is too good to waste so they get squirreled away to be reused.

Millane 3

I worked on top of a large discarded linocut and collaged a fragment of a two-colour screenprint that hadn’t worked out.

 

Over the previous week, I had been scribbling over some unused screenprints and also some vintage papers with Daler Rowney soft pastels, working randomly building up layers of colour and texture. I used these extensively to build up detail on my collage.

 

So my final piece started some years ago with disappointment in the print studio – happy accidents.

Millane 4

 

 

A lot of my artwork is available on my Artfinder gallery.  If you’d like to have a look, please click on the image below or the Artfinder link at the top right of this page.

Urban Shredder

25 Aug

Millane 1

Husb and I spent the day in Cardiff at the Mill Lane Arts Week en plein air public art event. Most of the artists there today were painting but I don’t really ‘get’ paint so I did a collage. I’ve been preparing collage papers all week ( please see the last few blog posts) and I got stuck into shredding and sticking the urban cityscape in front of me.

Millane 2

I worked onto a discarded print, a large linocut that hadn’t worked out but turned on its side, it was a good starting point. Then I added some large-ish areas of colour and texture from some unwanted screen prints, then began shredding in earnest to build up detail. I had wondered about working in some linear details with conté crayon or oil bars, but in the end I liked the rough abstract nature of it.

Loads of artists have been working en plein air throughout the week and our work is on display on Level 2, 10, Mill Lane, Cardiff for the next few days, if you’re anywhere near.

 

 

A lot of my artwork is available on my Artfinder gallery.  If you’d like to have a look, please click on the image below or the Artfinder link at the top right of this page.

Ready To Go

24 Aug

e Step 4

Here’s the last of the scribbly experiments I’ve been doing lately, using Daler Rowney pastels onto vintage papers. I’ve been thinking about how I can use these pieces in cityscape collages tomorrow in Cardiff Arts Week. I’ll be drawing / collaging en plein air around Mill Lane and The Hayes, so please come and have a chat if you’re passing.

 

A lot of my artwork is available on my Artfinder gallery.  If you’d like to have a look, please click on the image below or the Artfinder link at the top right of this page.

Sounds Like A Plan…

23 Aug

d Step 1

Still experimenting with pastels on paper today, this time using a beautiful mid-weight vintage paper from a British mill that no longer exists. I wanted to be a bit more specific with the colours so I started working with various blue Daler Rowney soft pastels, using both hands to make randomised marks on the paper and then getting grubby with my fingers, rubbing away at some of the areas to soften the lines and intensify the hues.

Then I divided the paper with a fold and worked into one half with a black pastel and into the other with pale blue and white. I’m starting to get some ideas for using these papers. I will be working en plein air on Friday this week at the Cardiff Arts Week festival in Mill Lane. I think that most of the artists involved will be painting but I don’t paint. Messy stuff. So I thought I’d use these prepared papers to do some collaged cityscapes, working in the details with something intense like carbon. Sounds like a plan to me.

 

 

 

A lot of my artwork is available on my Artfinder gallery.  If you’d like to have a look, please click on the image below or the Artfinder link at the top right of this page.

Doing It In Public

1 Oct

galerie-2

This evening Husb and I went to Galerie Simpson for the launch of a new book by local journalist and author Mark Rees, “The Little Book Of Welsh Culture“, part of Swansea’s Purple Flag weekend. I did some ‘live’ drawing of the event, working in public which is always a bit nerve-wracking. I did four drawings in all, over about an hour and a half.

evans

 

I prepared some sheets of paper before I went, a mixture of Italian Fabriano and vintage British papers. I stretched them and then gave them a coat of gesso and when that was dry, painted and drizzled them with my own home-made walnut ink. I don’t like working directly onto white paper. When I started, I used drawing pens at first but they were too fine so I switched to conté crayons in white, sanguine and black, which worked much better.

I did a mixture of individual and group sketches. There’s always a problem with drawing in public, people keep moving about. How very dare they?! ;D

close-up-2

 

There’s more of my art to be seen in my online Gallery in Artfinder, please click on the image below to take a look. Thank you.

Quoit

Rehomed

17 Feb

 

Pentre Ifan

Pentre Ifan

Back in the Autumn last year, Husb and I spend a weekend drawing ancient monuments around Pembrokeshire – in the rain, as ever. This is one I drew at Pentre Ifan, in chalk, charcoal and pastels. I drew it over an existing drawing I made in home-made walnut ink onto antique paper of the St. Paul’s catacombs in Malta. I’m chuffed that this drawing has just been sold from Artfinder and is being rehomed in North Wales. More of my work for sale can be found by clicking on the Artfinder widget on the right hand side of this page.

Tomorrow, I’m going on my travels around West Wales again to draw more ancient sites.

Emerging Heads

15 Aug

faces

 

I’ve spent two days working with the 15 Hundred Lives art collective in the Creative Bubble artspace, giving the public open access to our working processes and at the same time putting the finishing touches to the last pieces of work for our upcoming exhibition at Oriel Ceri Richards. Here I’m drawing onto vintage paper that I’d prepared by squeegeeing black and gold acrylic screen print inks straight onto the paper, to break up the tyranny of the white. I’m working onto it with chalk, compressed charcoal and white conte crayon. I’ve broken away from my usual practise of working directly from life, drawing instead from my imagination. The imagery that’s emerging has been influenced by some visits I made about three years ago to Berlin and Iceland, but more of that later. Now to bed. I’m shattered!

Faces From The Dark

26 Jul

faces

I have some lovely vintage papers and I’m trying out different ways of using them. I used a silkscreen squeegee to randomly coat a few sheets with acrylic paint, firstly in black and when that was dry, overlaid with a translucent bronze. Then I sat and looked at a sheet with a piece of willow charcoal in my hand. I had no idea what to do, I sketched a few lines, rubbed them out with a wetwipe (the acrylic surface wipes clean) and then lightly sketched some ellipses. I picked up a piece of chalk and then the faces began to emerge out of the dark without my bidding.

I don’t normally work from my imagination, usually directly from life, from my sketchbooks and occasionally from photographs, so it’s interesting what emerges without any references. The preparation of the paper and the method of random drawing without a stimulus is a bit like some of the techniques of automatic drawing used by Surrealists to develop their creativity. The painter, Gerhard Richter, also used a squeegee extensively in his work, to apply paint. I like using the squeegee, it’s so random.

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