Tag Archives: drawing

It’s All About The Cat

3 Jan

16 third kitten of the apocalypse

I was chatting to a young niece the other day and asked her if she looked at my blog or any of my social media stuff. “Only if there’s something about Sparta (my cat)” she said. Well, that puts me firmly in my place! Here’s Sparta Puss when she was a kitten, a tiny ball of fluff who was quite sweet back then, before she became quite so opinionated.

Foggy And Hangliding

30 Dec

worms head

Husb and I met up with some friends today for a good walk down at Rhossili, one of the most beautiful beaches in the world and a short drive from where we live. I took a brown paper sketchbook and some conté crayons to have a bit of a scribble. It was windy, cold and damp which didn’t make it easy to draw en plein air, so I stopped after a quick sketch. We walked down the steep path to the beginning of the causeway to the islands, which were cut off by the tide and then clambered back up the hillside. It was really foggy when we arrived but it lifted and some people took to hangliding above the huge beach.

Collage En Plein Air

29 Dec

Foxhole 7

Husb and I went for a walk down to Foxhole Bay on the Gower Peninsula today, partly to get some exercise and also to get some art work done en plein air. The land and sea are very rugged and I decided not to draw but to do some collage using papers I prepared quite a while ago, scribbling over recycled prints with oil pastels. I also had some sheets of sturdy watercolour paper that I had brushed with my home-made walnut ink.

 

 

We clambered down a steep, rough path and settled about 30 feet above sea level, on a flat area that is the remains of a rare Ipswichian raised beach, which was the sea level sometime in the past, probably before the last Ice Age. It was a good place to work, I laid out my board and ripped the different collage papers, laying them down on the watercolour paper and rearranging them, taking photos as I worked, inspired by, rather than slavishly copying, the environment around me. It’s an interesting way to work outside; the work of art is ephemeral, it exists in the camera. When I finished I smooshed the paper back into my folder to use another day.

Does Anyone Say Biro Anymore?

27 Dec

the range dec 2018

Husb and I were out and about today, doing some shopping for art supplies at The Range and we stopped for a cuppa. I spotted this woman across the cafe, absorbed in reading and thought I’d have a quick scribble, en plein air,  into my very small sketchbook, about 5 inches by 3.5 using a ballpoint pen. Does anyone call them Biros any more? They were always called Biro pens when I was a kid – I think that’s the name of the inventor.

 

 

Upstairs Downstairs

26 Dec

Called into Waterstones bookshop café today, it’s one of my favourite places for sketching en plein air because it’s upstairs with large windows overlooking the busy street which has a couple of benches often full of busy shoppers taking a rest. So I spy on them and draw them while I’m having a cuppa.

boxing day 2018

 

In At The Start

23 Dec

sketch 1a

So I’m thinking of doing some more large woodcuts in the new year, inspired by my drawings of the Mari Lwyd and Neolithic stone monuments in South Wales. I’ve done a lot of work on both of these so there’s plenty to inform anything I do. I begin by making little thumbnail sketches, lots of them, trying out different compositions. To me, that’s a primary function of a sketchbook, trying out ideas and establishing a starting point.

sketch 1 small

Well, I’ve started, but there’s a long, long way to go… If you want to find out more about the Mari Lwyd tradition in Wales please click here. And here’s a short film about my en plein air drawings on Neolithic and Bronze Age sites across South Wales.

 

 

 

 

A Massive Of Mari’s?

20 Dec

block 5

 

I finished carving my little lino yesterday evening, with a Mari Lwyd design from an original drawing en plein air. So today, off to Swansea Print Workshop to print it up. I used Caligo / Cranfield Safe Wash Relief ink with a Hosho Japanese paper and some recycled sari silk paper for the chine collé to add flashes of colour. Traditionally, the Mari is decorated with coloured ribbons to contrast with the white skull and shroud.

 

 

From left to right: Inking the block; applying the chine collé with Pritt stick glue; rubbing the back of the paper with a traditional Japanese baren.

And finally, a Massive of Mari’s. I don’t know if there’s an official collective noun, but I think Massive is cool.

block 4

If you want to read more about the ancient Welsh tradition of the Mari Lwyd, just click here .

And here.

 

 

Class Glass

12 Dec

 

Dinas garage

I had a lovely surprise today. Local stained glass artist Deanne Mangold, of Class Glass Wales, came to visit with a glass panel for me based on one of my drawings of ancient standing stones. Deanne had seen some of my drawings at an exhibition, Yr Helfa / The Hunt and wanted to translate one or two into stained glass. And here’s the result. I love it, it’s gorgeous.

 

The original drawing was done in the field, literally a field behind the garage in Dinas, North Pembrokeshire, where there’s a magnificent ancient stone monument. If you want to see more of my drawings en plein air of Neolithic and Bronze Age sites in Wales, please visit my Artfinder gallery.

 

A Head In The Gallery

16 Oct Male portrait showing character

artist

Another face scribbled in the gallery the other evening…… always good practice to draw when I’m in an audience ….. using a ballpoint pen into a small notebook …..

 

A Head In The Audience

15 Oct Drawing of a female head from the side with glasses pushed up

carys

Husb and I went to our local art gallery, the Glynn Vivian, last week to listen to the artist Simon Periton, currently exhibiting at Galerie Simpson, speak about his art practice. Of course, I had to have a scribble……

 

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