Tag Archives: #artforsale

The Bugs

6 Oct

 

Here’s a selection of bugs from my series of silkscreened postcard-sized prints I did recently at Swansea Print Workshop. One’s a cockchafer and the other a violet ground beetle from a collection at Swansea Museum’s archives.

 

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I printed some onto paper prepared with chine collé. I had printed sheets of handmade paper made from recycled saris, using a Gelli plate, Caligo relief inks and discarded fruit nets to create patterns. Please click here to find out more. They’re busy little critters ….

A Tissue Issue

5 Oct

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Workibng with Kelly Stewart at Swansea Print Workshop last week, I experimented with different ways to screenprint my range of drawings. I’ve always liked the chine collé technique especially with handmade paper made from recycled saris. I get it from the haberdashers in Swansea Market and it has a great texture and a some juicy colours.

 

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I used Japanese Nori glue to stick it down – it’s made with seaweed. The sari paper is quite thin, but very strong, so it was easy to silkscreen over it – thicker paper might have caused some technical problems. The term chine collé is French for tissue collage and these fine papers have traditionally been imported from Chine, Japan and the Indian subcontinent.

 

The Bits In The Middle

4 Oct

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The first stage in producing my recent set of screenprints was doing the drawings.

 

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Then came the bit in the middle. I had to produce a set of transparencies. Some were photocopied from the original drawings onto a special Overhead Projector (OHP) acetate – the two bugs and the heron.

 

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Some were redrawn onto cellophane using a brush and black acrylic paint – the two snipe. One was photocopied directly onto good quality tracing paper – the fruit net. And the text was handwritten onto Trugrain film using a Faber Castell Pitt drawing pen.

 

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The final stage is to transfer the transparencies onto a silkscreen.

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Beginning To End

3 Oct

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I started with an ink and wash sketch of a snipe (using my homemade walnut ink at Swansea Museum) drawn with brushes.

 

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Then, at Kelly Stewart’s screenprinting session at Swansea Print Workshop, I redrew it onto cellophane with brushes and black acrylic paint. These are the transparencies I used to create photoscreens.

 

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And then I screened them onto different papers, Fabriano and Somerset, with Daler Rowney System 3 Acrylic paint, mixed with Screenprint medium in an 80:20 paint to medium ratio.

 

That’s it from beginning to end.

The Cheeky Cockchafer

2 Oct

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Another of the small silkscreen prints I did recently. I started off by redrawing a little sketch of a snipe, but this time I did it onto cellophane with black acrylic paint. That formed a transparency for transferring to a photoscreen. I wanted to incorporate bits of rubbish to reflect the environment that much of our wildlife has to put up with. I used the net from a bag of fruit and put it through a photocopier onto a piece of good quality tracing paper. This became another transparency. I printed with Daler Rowney System 3 acrylic mixed 80:20 with screenprint medium onto Fabriano paper.

 

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Here’s a variation on the theme, with a cheeky cockchafer sneaking in ….

Things My Nana Used To Say…

1 Oct
A heron, a beetle and what my Nana used to say....

 

Here’s another of the small silkscreen prints I did recently. It’s a combination of several images – a heron, a cockchafer (melonontha melonontha) and a violet ground beetle (carabus violaceus) – that I had drawn from Swansea Museum’s archive collection, and they’re overlaid onto a piece of text.

I was working with a group of artists on a weekend course led by the Edinburgh-based artist Kelly Stewart. I was getting a bit stuck in the initial design stage, with quite a lot of wildlife drawings but nothing ‘graphic’ to tie them together. Kelly suggested text so I quickly scribbled some sayings that I used to hear from my Nana and other elderly women relatives.

I wrote with a Faber Castell Pitt drawing pen onto a piece of Trugrain film which provided a transparency to be exposed in the UV Unit at Swansea Print Workshop. More about the technical stuff tomorrow …. 

That Beetle Is Toast!

30 Sep

Here’s a little screeprint I did at the weekend. The characters are a snipe and a beetle, printed onto a Fabriano paper with a fragment of chine colle. I think that beetle’s days are numbered!

Birds And Bugs, Rubbish And Rugby

29 Sep

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I’ve just finished an exhausting three days working with Edinburgh-based Australian artist Kelly Stewart to develop a boxed set of small screenprints based on drawings we did from the Swansea Museum archives – taxidermy birds and invertebrates. I also included some imagery based on rubbish – the sort that ends up in our rivers and seas. I wanted to link the two types of images together.

 

Kelly took the group of us through the demanding technical challenge of producing so many multi-layered pieces in a relatively short time. She’s the consumate professional, and a really good sport. She wasn’t at all put out by Wales beating Australia in the Rugby World Cup as we worked. She had tea and Welsh Cakes to console her.

Birds And Bugs

28 Sep

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I spent yesterday drawing at Swansea Museum with a group of artists led by Edinburgh-based artist Kelly Stewart. It was arranged by Swansea Print Workshop who worked with staff from the Museum stores to select antique taxidermy specimens from their collection – a range of birds and bugs. I drew herons, a hawk, cockchafers and beetles.

 

 

I used different papers – Khadi hand-made, Winsor & Newton watercolour, Daler Rowney cartridge – and drawing materials – conté crayons, carbon and my home-made walnut ink.

 

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Today our group moved to the print workshop to do a two-day screenprint session with Kelly. I took my bugs and birds and the Gelli plate monotypes I did recently and developed the drawings into designs, made them into transparencies and then onto photosensitised silkscreens ready for printing tomorrow. That’s a lot of work done and a lot more to come……..

 

I’m currently artist-in-residence at the FIRE Laboratory in Swansea University, a scientific research project examining the ecology of the River Tawe. If you want to find out more about local freshwater fauna, check this out ….

Rubbish

27 Sep

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I’ve just done a dozen or so monotypes using rubbish. I recently became the artist in residence with the FIRE Lab at Swansea University and I’ve been going out on field trips with the science team along the River Tawe, looking at its ecosystem, which includes noting the rubbish. We used some rubbish we found to make cyanotypes a few weeks ago and I really liked the result, so I decided to try out a different printmaking technique with rubbish and Gelli plates.

 

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I started by inking a Gelli plate with a thin layer of Process Yellow Safewash ink from Caligo Cranfield and stretched a net fruit bag over it. Then I put a piece of Hosho Japanese lightweight paper on top and pressed it with my hands, to lift the ink. I repeated the process with another dozen sheets, putting different pieces of rubbish onto the Gelli plates, including ripped newspaper and old bubblewrap.

 

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Then I cleaned the equipment (in hot soapy water – so easy) and inked up in Process Red, using fresh pieces of rubbish placed at random on the Gelli plate. I put the yellow-printed papers face down and rubbed so the monotypes became yellow, red and orange.

 

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Finally, after cleaning everything, I repeated the whole thing with Process Blue.

 

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I think the rubbish looks pretty good ……

 

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…… I have plans for these ……..

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