Tag Archives: bereavement

A Winter Visit

27 Dec

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It’s a bit of a tradition at this time of year to visit our dead loved ones in cemeteries and memorial gardens. I went with Husb and Mam-in-Law to visit Dad-in-Law’s memorial stone in our local cemetery. It’s a lovely place, green with lots of trees and the noonday winter sun was low in the sky and cast long shadows across the bright grass.

When time is short, all you can do is get the main features of the landscape down, no time for lots of detail. I noticed that most of the gravestones were tilted, I don’t know why. Drawn with Faber Castell Pitt drawing pens sizes S, F and M into my A5 Tate Gallery sketchbook.

The Icelandic Hat

31 Dec

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Just over a year ago, Husb and I were striding across glaciers in Iceland. Husb had forgotten to take a winter hat with him and he bought a locally made, hand knitted traditional hat. He dug it out this week because the weather has been so bad, so I nabbed him for a scribble on my Samsung Galaxy Tablet using the Magic Marker app.

It’s been a strange year, coming to terms with the loss of a much loved family member and sometimes it’s been quite a struggle,but drawing and blogging every day has been a good focus for me. I hope that everyone has a happy and fulfilling year ahead.

Last Visit Last Page

31 Dec

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I haven’t blogged for a few days. My dear Dadinlaw died earlier this week and I haven’t had the heart to do anything much. I had my sketchbook on me on my last visit to the hospital and found some consolation sketching through the window. I wondered why hospitals always seem to have a large chimney. At the top of the hill in the distance is the local psychiatric hospital, also with a large chimney. My final visit to the hospital coincided with the last page in my purple silk recycled sari sketchbook. It’s packed with scribbles from hospital visits; we lost so many people we loved over this past year.

Dadinlaw died peacefully after a long illness and the nursing and medical staff caring for him were so kind to him and our family and treated him with gentleness and dignity. Sometimes things go wrong in the NHS and we shouldn’t shirk from complaining and making sure that problems are confronted, but when things work as they should, and mostly they do, the care is exemplary and we should be proud of what Dadinlaw’s generation set up, for it was they who created the NHS, pensions, free education, all the things we take for granted. They grew up in the poverty of the Great Depression in the 19320’s and ’30’s and made sure that their children and grandchildren didn’t suffer as they did.

And now we’re in danger of losing their marvellous vision through the idiocy of ignorant, overpriviledged politicians who have no idea of the reality of poverty nor the moral compass to want to do something about it. We can’t afford to be complacent; we owe it to the generation that is now dying out to keep their legacy alive.

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