Tag Archives: warriors

Art, Cake, Cake, Art

19 Sep

 

Invite Now The Printmakers a

 

Such a lot happening over the next week or so in Swansea and it all kicks off this Friday with the opening of the exhibition, “Now The Printmakers” at 5.30 pm at Swansea Print Workshop. Inspired by the work of Frank Brangwyn and Kathe Kollwitz, the show focusses on the work of three contemporary print artists – John Abell, Andrew Baldwin and yours truly as well as a group show of a dozen or so of our artist members. I’ll be there at 5.30 – with lashings of cake – but within the hour I’ve got to shoot across the city centre to the start of my Open Studio event at Volcano, also with lashings of cake…..

 

Invite Here Be Dragons a

And there are other exhibitions opening across the city that night – at Mission Gallery, Galerie Simpson and the Glynn Vivian, with the opening times staggered so art lovers can get around and see lots of them. It’s all leading up to next weeks major international art festival, “Now The Hero / Nawr Yr Arwr”, but more about that tomorrow……

If you’re out and about in Swansea on Friday 21st September, please pop in to one or more of the venues and get yourself some art and cake. There will be bara brith, banana cake, spiced apple cake and Victoria Sandwich……

bara brith 2

Traditional home-made bara brith

 

 

 

 

Marc, Frank And Victoria (Sandwich)

6 Sep

1536258215809.png

 

I’m back in the house for about 20 minutes between hearing the marvellous artist Marc Rees give a talk at the Glynn Vivian Art Gallery about his upcoming art extravaganza “Now The Hero / Nawr Yr Arwr” and heading off to life drawing at Swansea Print Workshop with my Samsung Galaxy Note 8 tablet (which I used to do this drawing) and a Victoria Sandwich. As you do.

Marc spoke in front of a backdrop of projected images, including many of the glorious panels by Frank Brangwyn, which are an integral part of Nawr Yr Arwr, so he’s in silhouette. I had to have a scribble. It’s what I do….

 

dsc05521.jpg

 

 

Now The Printmakers

23 Aug
banner

From left to right: Andrew Baldwin, Rose Davies, John Abell

 

Opening Friday 21st September from 17.30 to 20.00 and continuing 10.30 – 4.30 September 22nd to 30th EXCEPT Monday 24th.

Swansea Print Workshop, a hidden gem, is exhibiting original prints as part of “Nawr Yr Arwr / Now The Hero“, inspired by World War 1 artists Frank Brangwyn and Käthe Kollwitz with work by artist members alongside three featured Welsh printmakers:

John Abell (Cardiff), woodcuts from “The Diary of a Dead Officer” published by Old Stile Press

Andrew Baldwin (Trefeglwys, Powys), etchings and mezzotints inspired by the World War 1 battlefield

And me! Rose Davies / Rosie Scribblah (Swansea), monotypes and etchings from “The Warrior”, a series from my 10 year working relationship with Captain David Williams, a serving soldier and life model, who also features in Nawr yr Arwr.

 

Here’s a short video of me and my model working on a new monotype for “Nawr Yr Arwr / Now The Hero”

 

Frank Brangwyn and Käthe Kollwitz were accomplished multidisciplinary artists, both lived and worked through World War 1, and both excelled in the medium of printmaking. Drawing inspiration from the wealth of print media in which they worked, including etching, woodcut and lithography, Swansea Print Workshop’s exhibition will respond to the rich visual wealth of the sumptuous Brangwyn panels and the recent Glynn Vivian Art Gallery exhibition of Käthe Kollwitz prints.

 

The Starting Point

18 Aug

The Warrior Turns small

Yesterday I posted about the upcoming immersive art event in Swansea in September – Nawr yr Arwr / Now the Hero. I will be exhibiting some of the work I have been doing over the past decade with a young , now not so young, soldier who is also a life model. I’ve been looking through it all and it’s a big body of work. The starting point is life drawings, which I do most weeks at Swansea Print Workshop.

Warrior Turns print l

From the hundreds of drawings I have in sketchbooks and portfolios, I select some for development, usually into original prints. This one started as a pastel sketch on a canvas sheet and I developed it into a full-colour monotype (see my Techie section for how to do it). Very early on, I started to investigate the idea of The Warrior and this is reflected in the work I’ve done. This was done near the start of our working relationship and it’s called ,”The Warrior Turns To Face The Darkness“.

 

 

One From The Archives 5: The Warrior Prone

13 Sep
SONY DSC

Full colour reduction monotype

I did a small series of full colour reduction monotypes a few years ago, working with a young soldier I know who is also a life model when he’s on leave. He loves modelling and he’s really good at it. From an artist’s perspective, it’s fascinating to work with a man in the prime of life who is in the best possible physical condition, not overdone like a body builder but as fit as it’s possible for a human male to be.

But apart from that, what resonated with me is the danger of his job. He loves what he does, which is difficult for me as I abhor war, but I also accept that some humans are born to be warriors and this man is one of them. And he is a son and a grandson and a brother, as human as the rest of us. All my monotypes are based on original life drawings. I do many in my sketchbooks but only a few make it through to development into something else – a monotype, etching, screenprint, painting etc… When I chose the drawings to develop for the ‘Warrior’ mini-series, I focused on my own feelings and showed the vulnerability of the model. Warrior he may be, but he’s also fragile flesh and bone and his life could be snuffed out so easily.

Warrior prone small

The original drawing, charcoal into an A3 sketchbook

 

The full-colour reduction monotype process produces one piece with deep, jewel-like colours but I also put another piece of the gorgeous BFK Rives paper through the antique etching press at Swansea Print Workshop to take a second – ghost – impression. This technique was beloved by Impressionist artists Degas and Monet and they often worked over the ghost monotype with oil pastels. But often, the untouched image is quite beautiful without any more work, the oil pigments break up slightly like an Impressionist painting.

The 'ghost' Warrior Prone

The ‘ghost’ Warrior Prone

If you want to find out more technical details about monotypes, please click here to go through to the technical section on my website. The “Warrior Prone” is available for sale on Artfinder and if you’d like to find out more, please click on the link here to go directly to it or click on the link on the right hand side of this blog to see other works for sale.

 

%d bloggers like this: