Tag Archives: British Museum

Inspired By Käthe

3 May
WAA exhibit

My three-dimensional form made from cut and stitched Shiohara paper, with hand writing and Kathe Kollwitz stamps developed from an original screenprint.

 

In June, I will be running a two – day masterclass at the Glynn Vivian art gallery, linked to their excellent Kathe Kollwitz exhibition.  Exploring her life and political activism through her drawings and printmaking, I will be covering two techniques, drypoint and woodcut, drawing inspiration directly from her magnificent work and using the exhibition as a catalyst to create small editions over the weekend.

 

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A digital drawing I did based on Kathe’s woodcut, The Widow.

 

I love Käthe’s work, I have admired her for decades, I’m so chuffed that she has her own exhibition in my local gallery.

Please click here if you want tickets for this masterclass.

Ripped From The Darkness

20 Apr

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Our local art gallery, The Glynn Vivian, is showing a fabulous exhibition of drawings and prints by the formidable German artist Käthe Kollwitz. I have admired her work and life for so many years, I’m beside myself to see this exhibition so close to home. I like to study artists I admire and copy from the great mistresses and masters. This is a digital study I made today from her woodcut “The Widow” from the early 1920s. She is very sparing with the cutting tool, there are surprisingly few cuts which I think increases its impact, the sense that the image has been ripped from the surrounding darkness.  I didn’t finish it, there’s another hand in the original. I can never resist a good book and I bought the exhibition book as a birthday present to myself, it’s “Portrait Of The Artist: Käthe Kollwitz” by Frances Carey and Max Egremont, published by The British Museum and IKON.

I drew this with a, now ancient, Samsung Galaxy Note 8 tablet using a free app called Markers. I laid a black ground down and drew with white lines.

A Grand Night Out

23 Mar
Kathe

Image: Käthe Kollwitz (1867-1945), Self-portrait with hand against cheek (before July 1906) © The Trustees of the British Museum

So this evening, Swansea was buzzing with crowds of arty types milling between no less than 5 galleries opening exhibitions on the same night. I dropped into the effervescent Galerie Simpson to start with, then up to the magnificent Glynn Vivian Art Gallery for the opening of “Portrait Of The Artist – Käthe Kollwitz”. I’ve been desperate to see this show, which had been at Ikon in Birmingham last year, in partnership with the British Museum and supported by the Dorset Foundation. She is one of my heroes and I love her work so much. I’m a total fangirl.

According to the gallery, “Kollwitz’s unique artistic talent, her technical prowess and intelligence, and above all her humanity, can be seen in this exhibition. There is much about the life and work of Kollwitz that instils hope, that is inspiring and life affirming, despite the burden of hardship and sorrow carried by so many of her figures and by herself. Her emphasis was often on what was distinctive about women’s experience, including the fundamental nature and potency of maternal love. She believed that art could be a force for good in society.”

And there’s a book! I had to have it. The exhibition carries on until the 17th of June and I might be running a weekend printmaking masterclass there, linked to the exhibition……. It’s worth a trip to Swansea to see this and the other shows on at the moment at Galerie Simpson, Volcano, Mission Gallery and Elysium, but not on Mondays.

 

 

 

After da Vinci, with a cat

19 Feb

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Another of my practice pieces copying Renaissance drawings. This time a little sketch by da Vinci of a small child playing with a cat. The original is very rough and sketchy, very lively. I guess it had to be that way because a cat and small child are not going to stay still for more than a couple of seconds. In fact, the kitteh looks like it can’t wait to get away. He did quite a lot of these sketches; I wonder if the child escaped without scratches? It’s tempting when copying another artist to tidy up the drawing, to ‘complete’ it but I tried to remain as true to the original as possible, given that I’m using 21st century instead of 15th century materials.

Drawn onto my Samsung Galaxy Tablet using a free Markers app. The reference book is ‘Fra Angelico to Leonardo: Italian Renaissance Drawings by Hugo Chapman and Marzia Faietti published by The British Museum.

After Filippo Lippi

18 Feb

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Another quick digital sketch based on a drawing by fifteenth century artist, Fra Filippo Lippi. I did this on my Samsung Galaxy Tablet using a free Markers app. The drawing is in a British Museum book, ‘Fra Angelico to Leonardo: Italian Renaissance Drawings’ by Hugo Chapman and Marzia Faietti. I think it’s good to get some academic practice from experienced artists.

Day 5: I Don’t Care!

5 Feb

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So continuing with the 28 Drawings After challenge on Facebook and practicing drawing from established artists, I took up with Raphael again. Husb gave me a lovely book on Renaissance drawing from The British Museum that I’ve been meaning to draw from for ages. I’m using the Samsung Galaxy Tablet again with a free Magic marker app. It’s probably very old-fashioned, but I think it’s important for artists to study those who have gone before. I think that’s part of learning the craft in art, although that also seems to be an old-fashioned concept at the moment. Ah well, I don’t care 😀

Back To Basics

12 Apr

12 basics

I’ve been trying to push out of my comfort zone at Life Drawing group for a while now. Last night I pulled out a piece of very heavy and textured hand-made paper, a bit bigger than A4, that I’d prepared with acrylic gesso overlaid, when dry, with compressed charcoal and then sealed with spray fixative. The surface wasn’t smooth enough for any of my pens so fine detail was out. I grabbed a white oil bar and focussed on the basic shapes contained within the body.  This model is a larger, mature lady and she reminds me a lot of the sculptures I saw recently at the British Museum’s Ice Age Art exhibition. The heavy texture of the paper gives the surface a rock-like quality and it feels more hewn than drawn.

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