Tag Archives: Devil’s Bridge

A Trip To Hinterland

16 Nov

Chasm draw

We’ve been in lockdown for what seems like forever so Husb booked us an evening away at the Hafod Hotel at Devil’s Bridge – Pont ar Fynach – in Ceredigion, for a bit of a break. It’s a very atmospheric part of the world and features a lot in the Cymru Noir crime drama TV series “Hinterland“.

Chasm view

Dusk was already drawing in on a gloomy afternoon when we checked in and we had a lovely room with a spectacular view along the chasm  – the Devil’s Bridge is at the bottom of it. I grabbed some conté crayons and scribbled the view quickly into my brown paper sketchbook before it became too dark.

spooky house

The lovely but spooky Hafod Hotel, right above the Devil’s Bridge.

 

 

 

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left and to see the complete image.

Inspired by drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artefacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

Devil’s Bridge

16 May
The gorge at Devil's Bridge

The gorge at Devil’s Bridge

Hunting wild megaliths in West Wales last week, we took a detour to Devil’s Bridge in Ceredigion, near Aberystwyth.It’s an extraordinary gorge – at the top, three separate bridges are stacked on top of one another. The most recent is an iron bridge  from 1901, under this is one from 1753 and under that, the original from 1075–1200.

Here the River Mynach drops a spectacular 90 metres down the ravine until it meets the River Rheidol. According to legend the original bridge was built by the Devil because it was too difficult for humans and in return the Devil would take the soul of the first living thing that crossed it. He was tricked by an old woman who threw bread onto the bridge so that her dog ran across. The Devil was furious but didn’t want the soul of a dog and disappeared in a puff of smoke.

I drew onto Fabriano paper prepare with my home-made walnut ink, using carbon and Daler Rowney soft pastels.

I’m travelling around South West Wales with archaeologist Dewi Bowen who is researching his new book on Neolithic / Bronze Age monuments based on the trail of The Boar Hunt, Y Twrch Trwyth, from The Mabinogion, a book of Welsh Legend. His previous book on the stones of Ancient Siluria (South East Wales) can be found here. Accompanying us is film maker Melvyn Williams who is recording a documentary about our experiences. Some of Melvyn’s short films can be seen here. I’m currently working on a series of expressive drawings of ancestral sites and if you want to see some of my other artworks, please click here.

 

The Stone In The Wall

13 May
Ysbyty Cynfyn

Ysbyty Cynfyn

Another standing stone on our hunt for the wild megalith. We tracked this one down, along with it’s companion (blogged yesterday) in a wall around a Christian church in Ysbyty Cynfyn near Devil’s Bridge, Ceredigion. It’s looks like it’s a Bronze Age site that has been Christianised. The word Ysbyty is Welsh for Hospital and it is likely that the area was once controlled by the Knights of St. John (or the Knights Hospitallers) and it’s possible that there was a hospice here, serving the pilgrims en route to St. Davids.

The stone in the wall

The stone in the wall

I drew with various conte crayons, carbon and soft pastels over Fabriano paper prepared with my own home-made walnut ink. These drawing are becoming increasingly abstracted as I focus on elements of the subject rather than doing a strict representation. The significant thing for me while I was drawing this ancient Neolithic stone is the way it is bisected by the Christian church, the wall seeming to go through it, but still it remains rooted in the ground and towers above the top of the wall.

I’m travelling around South West Wales with archaeologist Dewi Bowen who is researching his new book on Neolithic / Bronze Age monuments. His previous book on the stones of Ancient Siluria (South East Wales) can be found here. Accompanying us is film maker Melvyn Williams who is recording a documentary about our experiences. Some of Melvyn’s short films can be seen here. I’m currently working on a series of expressive drawings of ancestral sites and if you want to see some of my other artworks, please click here.

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