Tag Archives: rhubarb crumble

Sketching, Masking And An Explosive Pudding

6 Apr

Back to basics

Back to basics today with a little bit of sketching. I’m going to try and do a good few of these over the coming week. I’ve been neglecting my sketchbook work for a while, which is really slack of me. Sketching is good practice and I need to take it more seriously. I used to sketch almost every day but I’ve seriously lapsed during the last year of pandemic lockdowns. I’m working from photos, but that’s the way it is at the moment.

Hardcore

I treated myself to a new respirator mask. I’m starting to fancy doing some woodcuts on MDF and disposable masks are not really good enough for any serious carving, so I got this lovely little number, a NA&UM Chemical Respirator Mask M101. It’s pretty hardcore – I think I’ll wear it to the local shop.

First of the season

And I made the first rhubarb crumble of the season. The garden rhubarb is lovely, very mild and pink and it’s just gorgeous with custard. That’s a Husb sized portion there, any more than a spoonful for me has an explosive effect on my digestive system, I’m afraid.

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left and to see the complete image.

Inspired by drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artefacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

The Collage, The Tip And The Cake

11 Nov

Tip 1

I’ve been smearing leftover paints onto nice papers over the past few months, building up a store of collage papers to experiment with. I recently started thinking about the Hafod tip in Swansea which was opposite my bedroom window for much of my childhood. And looming above it in the distance was the equally black and ruined Kilvey Hill. It took many years to remove the tip and bring life back to the hill, but they’re unrecognisable now.

Tip 1a

I thought I’d start ripping up fragments of the collage papers to stick into my sketchbook and then cover them with a sheet of cellophane and paint it with black acrylic paint. That way I can try things out without putting the black paint over the collage papers. Once the acrylic paint is dry, I can scrape into it, rub sections away, play with it to reveal some of the background colours and textures. Early days yet though.

Xmas cake 2020

Oh and I baked my Xmas cake. And made the last rhubarb crumble of the year.

 

 

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left and to see the complete image.

Inspired by drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artefacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

Finished Faking, More Baking

19 Jul

Hockney 3

I finished faking Friday’s faux Hockney, that’s about 4 hours in all. I’m not a painter, I much prefer drawing and printmaking. If I’m honest, to me, painting is like colouring in. I know painters will be outraged, but once I’ve done the drawing, that’s the creative bit over for me. But, doing these weekly paintings has been good practice and kept me occupied through the pandemic.

 

I also made a couple of rhubarb crumbles. I’m taking the big crumble to family for their tea and the smaller one is for Husb. He takes no prisoners when it comes to crumble.

rhubarb crumble

The rhubarb in the garden is HUGE! It’s like a rhubarb jungle out there.

rhubarb

 

Why not join in with Ed Sumner’s Cheese and Wine Painting Club on Friday lunchtimes. It’s free or a donation if you can afford it. Next week is Turner’s The Fighting Temeraire.

 

 

 

 

 

Collage And Crumble

11 Jul

collage 1

Earlier this week when I was thinking about white ravens, I thought I’d maybe try and develop some imagery using collage. So I rooted around in my plans chest and found some vintage papers and printmaking rejects that I had randomly coloured with oil and soft pastels. They’re a good starting point.

rhubarb crumble

And I made rhubarb crumble, There’s tons growing in the garden. I’ve made rhubarb chutney, rhubarb gin and I bottled some in syrup. Oh and a bottle of rhubarb cordial – or laxative as I accurately call it.

Big Wig And Crumble

23 Mar

DSC07188

We went to a Kate Bush themed birthday party yesterday and our friend, who is a strapping bloke, dressed as Kate in  mahoosive wig. Fair do’s.Drawn into my A5 clothbound sketchbook with Faber Castell Pitt pens sizes F and B.

DSC07187

And today, I picked the first of the new season’s rhubarb from the garden and made Husb’s all time favourite, rhubarb crumble. With lashings of custard, of course.

 

The Kitchen Sink

24 Jun

Had a lovely evening last night, visiting a friend’s house for a meal, conversation, music, molestation by a wet cat etc…… Our friend is a fabulous chef and put on a Middle Eastern spread of mezze followed by tagine. Then some of the chaps cleaned up and here’s one of them doing the dishes. It occurred to me how times have changed. When I was growing up, we didn’t have people round for a meal; there was barely enough food for the family and it was plain British grub – no-one would have a clue what an olive was, let alone mezze and a tagine.  And as for men cleaning up?!? Unheard of. Things are so much better now 😀

The cat, Puss Puss, loves water and kept going out into the storm, getting absolutely soaked then coming in, drying herself on the guests and diving back out into the torrential rain again. We reverted to good old-fashioned British grub for dessert – rhubarb crumble – yum!

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