Tag Archives: German Expressionism

Carrying On Carrying On

15 Sep

trees 1 step f

I carried on working on a painting I started a couple of weeks ago, based on a charcoal drawing I did en plein air into my Khadi sketchbook. I am trying to develop a style of my own – I’ve never done much painting and it’s my lockdown challenge. I really like the German Expressionists and am finding that I’m being influenced by them. But I’ve recently reached a stage where I don’t know how – or if – to progress with the painting. I’m happy with the composition and the broad colour scheme but it feels a bit unfinished to me.

trees 1 step f detail

So I just had a quick go yesterday, developing the brushwork and putting in a creamy colour to replaced the stark white bare canvas in the previous stage. Here’s a close up. I like the quick, gestural brushstrokes but I also want to add a bit more depth and richness, not necessarily more detail.

 

 

 

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

In this one, I combined the image of the bird with snippets of text of things my Nana used to say. She used to take me to Swansea Museum a lot when I was small and I could hear her voice in the back of my head as I was sitting and drawing the birds and bugs.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

Quick, Short And Angry

9 Sep

9 Cwmdonkin

I was in a really foul mood this evening, caught the bad side of Twitter and was raging. So Husb dragged me out for a long, fast walk.  We ended up in Cwmdonkin Park which has been one of my favourite places for drawing en plein air during the pandemic. I was still in a temper when I did the drawing, the marks I made with the charcoal are quick, short and angry ….. a bit like me.

 

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

 

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

In this one, I combine some of the images with snippets of text of things my Nana used to say. She used to take me to Swansea Museum a lot when I was little and I could hear her voice in the back of my head as I was sitting and drawing the birds and bugs.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

 

Carry On Painting….

7 Sep

I’m carrying on today with a painting I started a couple of weeks ago. I left it alone for a while because I wasn’t sure how to develop it so I had a break to look at it with fresh eyes.

It’s based on a charcoal drawing I did en plein air into my Khadi sketchbook. I’ve been practicing painting a lot throughout the lockdown, it’s been my challenge to myself as I wanted to improve my skills. I’m a great admirer of the German Expressionists, especially Gabrielle Munter, so I’m using colour to invoke mood and atmosphere rather than trying to be naturalistic. I’m using Liquitex heavy body acrylic paints, mostly transparent, onto a primed Winsor & Newton canvas. Here are the previous stages below…

 

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

 

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

In this one, I combine some of the images with snippets of text of things my Nana used to say. She used to take me to Swansea Museum a lot when I was little and I could hear her voice in the back of my head as I was sitting and drawing the birds and bugs.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

 

A Very Sloppy Finish

26 Aug

trees 1 step e

I carried on with the expressionist-inspired painting I’m doing from one of my recent en plein air sketchbook drawings. Two things are coming up for me. First, the colours I’m using are intuitive and reflect something that’s going on inside somewhere, linked to the pandemic and lockdown – this is an emotional and cathartic thing that I’m doing.

Secondly, way back when I was in art college (when dinosaurs roamed the earth) I did a lot of painting and I was put off by lecturers who kept going on about my work being “unfinished”. They wanted me to work in a very traditional, polished style which although is a good thing to learn, wasn’t what I wanted to do. So I drifted away from painting and found expression in drawing and printmaking. The weekly sessions I’ve been doing throughout the pandemic with the Cheese and Wine Painting Club over on Facebook have given me much more confidence in handling paint. I’ve discovered that many of the great painters we’ve been studying have got a very sloppy finish, which makes me feel a whole lot better.

 

A Chance To Own One Of My Artworks

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

In this one, I combined the image of the bird with snippets of text of things my Nana used to say. She used to take me to Swansea Museum a lot when I was small and I could hear her voice in the back of my head as I was sitting and drawing the birds and bugs.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

 

Channelling Gabrielle and Paula

25 Aug

trees 1 step c

This is new for me, I’m doing a painting based on a sketch done en plein air a few weeks back. I’ve been practicing my paint skills with the Cheese and Wine Painting Club on Facebook throughout the lockdown and now I feel confident enough to do one of my own. I love the German Expressionists, especially Gabrielle Münter and Paula Mödersohn-Becker. I love the way they express feelings though colour and gestural marks, rather than copy nature. So I guess I’m channelling Gabrielle and Paula for this one.

Here’s the original drawing, willow charcoal on Khadi paper, and the first two stages of the painting before I started to add colour, using transparent Liquitex Heavy Body acrylics.

 

I have some small screenprints for sale, inspired by my drawings of the taxidermy collection at Swansea Museum. I have given these antique artifacts a modern twist by combining them with images of rubbish – old fruit nets, bubble wrap and plastic – highlighting the problem of human pollution and how it affects wildlife.

To buy my work on the Swansea Print Workshop site please click the image to the left.

In this one, I combined the image of the bird with snippets of text of things my Nana used to say. She used to take me to Swansea Museum a lot when I was small and I could hear her voice in the back of my head as I was sitting and drawing the birds and bugs.

20 percent of the cost of each screenprint sold goes to support Swansea Print Workshop, which receives no public funding.

 

Across The Planet

12 Dec

annwyl KATHE

 

It’s lovely to see where artwork can get to when it leaves me and it’s released out in the wild. I did this mixed media piece, “Annwyl Käthe” – stamping, chine collé, stitching and hand written text – in an edition of 15 for the annual Leftovers print exchange organised by Wingtip Press in Idaho, USA. Part of Leftovers is an annual international touring exhibition and this has just featured in a show at the Wharepuke Gallery in New Zealand.

 

Wharepuke

It looks gorgeous. Maybe someday I’ll get across the world for a visit. If you are a printmaker and want to get involved in Leftovers VIII, please click here.

Annwyl Kathe

22 Jan

annwyl-4

Once upon a time, the printmakers of Wingtip Press in Boise, Idaho, USA were cleaning out their flat files and found dozens of little scraps of expensive printmaking papers jamming up the drawers. Realising they probably weren’t alone with the dilemma of what to do with all those too-precious-to-throw-out leftover paper scraps, they issued an invitation to fellow printmakers around the globe to participate in a print exchange to use all those lovely bits of paper.

Artists submit an edition of 15 miniature prints and received a dozen prints in return. One of the edition is included in a silent auction to raise funds for the Hunger Relief Task Force in the State another edition joins an international touring exhibition. Now in its seventh year, the exchange includes printmakers from Australia to Arizona, Canada to Colorado, Nevada to Norway to New Zealand, Korea to Kansas, Wales to Washington, and places in between! The box of over a hundred little prints recently crossed the Atlantic from Reno to The Rhondda Valley and has just finished its exhibition at Swansea Print Workshop.

I’ve just completed my little edition of 15 for Leftovers VII. It’s inspired by my admiration for German Expressionist artist Käthe Kollwitz and I’ve done some little prints from a rubber stamp I had made from a screenprint I had done of her. The print is on a Japanese Shiohara paper which sews nicely so I have stitched them to J Green & Sons vintage paper (supplied by the Vintage Paper Co) with a strip of ripped hand-made paper, embedded with petals, in between. Finally I wrote in Welsh pencil on each “Annwyl Käthe, ‘dw i’n caru di….” (Dear Käthe, I love you….)

leftovers-vii-call_web-1

For more information about entering your prints for Leftovers VII, please contact Wingtip Press. The deadline has been extended to March 15th and the opportunity for two artists to do a residency at Wingtip has been added.

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I am putting my series of drawings of ancient Welsh monuments on Artfinder.  If you want to buy one, you can see them by clicking on the image below or the Artfinder link at the top right of this page.

St Elvis

Chiaroscuro In A Doorway

28 Dec

door

After a bit of a break for Xmas and too much good food and gallivanting, it’s head down for a bit more serious work. I’m carrying on with my series of small drawings from photos taken in the old church recently, using the simplest of materials, white conte crayon into an A4 Daler Rowney ‘Ebony’ sketchbook. I’m trying to explore atmospheric mark making and get out of my comfort zone, which is a fine pen into a little sketchbook. These drawings emphasise chiaroscuro and I hope they’ll eventually lead to some more finished work in manier noir style drawings or even some mezzotints. These interiors remind me a bit of German Expressionist film sets, one of my favourite periods of art and printmaking.

Drawing In Darkness

22 Feb

22 vampyr

Husb and I went to Taliesin Arts Centre this evening to see a version of Dreyer’s 1932 silent film, Vampyr accompanied by live musicians. It was fantastic. I had a bash at drawing in the dark, using a complete set of sepia Faber Castell Pitt drawing pens in sizes S, F, M and B and drawing into my A5 clothbound sketchbook. It was a challenge to draw dark subject matter in the dark. I could hardly see what I was doing so I hastily sketched in the light bits when there was a bit of light from the cinema screen and spent most of the time making marks to fill in the dark areas with different size pens. The mark making was also influenced by the music and the film which is full of German Expressionist motifs.

 

 

A Stroppy Cat, Kathe Kollwitz in Berlin, The Best Apple Strudel Ever

26 Jul

by Kathe Kollwitz”] 

Just enough time for today’s quick blog after having a fight with a small furry cat over a flea comb. She won. Ouch!

 

We visited the Kathe Kollwitz museum during our Berlin trip. I’ve loved her work for many years and I think she’s one of the greatest artists of the twentieth century. I defy anyone to go around the gallery and not cry – her work is profoundly moving. She suffered the tragedy of losing her son in World War 1 and her grandson in WW2 and her war memorial, ‘The Grieving Parents’ in the Vladsio German War Cemetery is imbued with a terrible sadness and hopelessness. I did a quick sketch of one of her tragic prints, which she did between the two World Wars; it shows the terrible living conditions in Germany that were partially responsible for the rise of the Nazis. Moving and chilling at the same time.

 

We went out into the sculpture garden at the back of the museum and a path in the deep snow led to the National Institute of Literature next door, which had a conservatory style restaurant. We had hot Nuremburger sausages and sauerkraut followed by the best Apple Strudel we’ve ever tasted, served with sweet, hot vanilla custard. The ancient friendly waiter led us out through the main building to show us the wonderful Art Nouveau hallway and landings that had survived the War, covered in exquisite mosaic and stained glass.

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