Tag Archives: St. Cuthbert’s Mill

A Last Little Quickie

11 Aug

quickie 2

And here’s the last of the very quick watercolour sketches I made recently, sitting in the sunshine on the clifftop in Southgate overlooking the sea. I concentrated on capturing the flow of the colours before me, rather than recording details. I’ve never been particularly into land / seascape art so I don’t have any hard and fast rules to influence me. I’m just hanging out doing my own thing. I used Winsor & Newton half pan watercolours with a glued block of Waterford watercolour paper from St. Cuthbert’s Mill.

 

I am putting my series of drawings of ancient Welsh monuments on Artfinder.  If you’d like to see them, please click on the image below or the Artfinder link at the top right of this page.

St Elvis

Another Quickie

8 Aug

quickie 1

I’m so lucky to live near the sea and Husb and I are often strolling along the beach, or we’ll go for a short drive to walk along cliffs or along an estuary path. I’ve started to carry my Winsor & Newton half pan watercolours and a Waterford glued block of watercolour paper to capture some quick fleeting impressions. It’s nice to play with the materials and not get bogged down in fine detail, always a dilemma I think with watercolour.

 

 

I am putting my series of drawings of ancient Welsh monuments on Artfinder.  If you’d like to see them, please click on the image below or the Artfinder link at the top right of this page.

St Elvis

PsychedeliCat 2

7 Aug

Psychedelicat 2

Not quite as psychedelic as yesterday’s PsychedeliCat but still pretty colourful. I have a miserable summer cold and my brain has turned into cotton wool so I’m entertaining myself doing little pencil drawings of cats onto my Waterford watercolour block and colouring them in with Winsor & Newton half pan watercolours. I’ll get back to some serious work when I shake off this rotten cold.

 

I am putting my series of drawings of ancient Welsh monuments on Artfinder.  If you’d like to see them, please click on the image below or the Artfinder link at the top right of this page.

St Elvis

PsychedeliCat

6 Aug

Psychedelicat 1

I did a small drawing in pencil of this cat back in December, onto my Saunders Waterford watercolour paper block, and have only just now got round to painting it. I can’t move onto the next sheet of paper because it’s one of those glued blocks so I have to finish everything on it before peeling it off and starting the next one.

I don’t want to do a realistic painting. I was a child back in the 1960s and loved the psychedelic art around at that time. I have a few of these cat drawings to paint so I’m going to make them all psychedelicats. I’m using Winsor & Newton half pans.

 

 

I am putting my series of drawings of ancient Welsh monuments on Artfinder.  If you want to buy one, you can see them by clicking on the image below or the Artfinder link at the top right of this page.

St Elvis

Quickies In The Sun

5 Aug

3 quickies in the sun

A dry and sunny day in August is as rare as hen’s teeth in these here parts so despite smothering with a cold and sore throat, Husb and I put on our jackets and drove down to Southgate on the Gower Peninsula for a couple of hours. I sat in the sunshine on the clifftop and did some quick and tiny watercolour studies, en plein air, using Winsor & Newton half pans onto a rough Saunders Waterford watercolour paper (300 gsm) from St. Cuthbert’s Mill which comes as a glued block. I haven’t used glued paper before and it’s brilliant, no need to stretch the paper before use. I tried to ignore the detail of what I saw before me and concentrate on getting down the colours while Husb picked blackberries. He’s in the kitchen now, getting this year’s Bramble Jelly started. mmmmmmmm 😀

 

Frantic Felix

23 Dec

frantic-felix

The second of our little furry friends from the hotel we stayed at in Kyrenia recently. Husb and I called him Felix because he looks like the cat from the Felix food adverts. He was a persistent little tyke, mewing frantically when we passed him on the path and wrapping himself around our legs top stop us in our tracks until we pulled some leftovers from dinner out for him. I’ve sketched him onto St Cuthbert’s watercolour paper with a ‘B’ Derwent pencil from a digital photo. I’ll probably watercolour him next week, once the Xmas franticness is over.

 

I am putting my series of drawings of ancient Welsh monuments on Artfinder.  If you want to buy one, you can see them by clicking on the image below or the Artfinder link at the top right of this page.

St Elvis

The Lucky Winner

6 Jun

Winner

 

I rarely win anything, probably because I don’t enter competitions or do the lottery and things like that. But sometimes you see little competitions on Facebook and Twitter asking you to like and repost / retweet something and then you’ll be entered for a prize draw. I often click these and I’ve won twice. The first time I won a lovely printed tote bag designed by illustrator Gayle Rogers from the Workers Gallery. And recently I clicked on a link to the Sunday Times Watercolour competition organised by Parker Harris and my prize came through the post today, a pad of very expensive Saunders cotton paper from St. Cuthbert’s Mill. Lovely.

I’m currently working on a series of expressive drawings of ancestral sites and if you want to see some of my other artworks, please click here.

Copper And Stone

7 May
The first proof off the new etching plate

The first proof off the new etching plate

I etched two plates at the recent course at Swansea Print Workshop with Andrew Baldwin of Trefeglwys Print Studio, one aluminium, one copper. I’ve just done a first proof from the copper plate. I used a hardground and the traditional technique of drawing into it with an etching needle than adding aquatint. Andrew demonstrated how to do aquatint using his non-toxic B.I.G. process which involved putting the grounded plate through the etching press with a piece of emery paper face down on top of the ground. This cuts tiny holes into the ground which will etch as an aquatint. I did several dips into Ferric Chloride, ‘stopping’ out areas as I went along to develop the different tones.

 

Then I cleaned the B.I.G. ground off the plate, dried it and inked it up to take the first proof. It’s paler than I wanted it, possibly I needed to etch it for longer, possibly it’s a result of using a very soft ‘drypoint’ ink with a soft Somerset paper. I need to try another proof with a heavier, stiffer ink to see if it makes a difference, otherwise I’m going to have to do some work on the plate.

Andrew Baldwin’s new book comes out in October in conjunction with the opening of the ‘BIG Exhibition’. The book will give step by step guides to all the processes that can be used with BIG. The call for entries for the exhibition is open from 1st June and is open to all who have made prints using BIG. All entries should first be sent to Andrew via atb@aber.ac.uk. The exhibition will open at The School of Art in October and then travel to other galleries in UK before going over to USA.

The subject is the King’s Quoit stone monument at Manorbier in Pembrokeshire. I’m travelling around South West Wales with archaeologist Dewi Bowen who is researching his new book on Neolithic / Bronze Age monuments. His previous book on the stones of Ancient Siluria (South East Wales) can be found here. Accompanying us is film maker Melvyn Williams who is recording a documentary about our experiences. Some of Melvyn’s short films can be seen here. I’m currently working on a series of expressive drawings of ancestral sites and if you want to see some of my other artworks, please click here.

 

The First Proof!

5 May

First proof

I spent this afternoon at an Open Access session at Swansea Print Workshop, ready to take a first proof from my coffee-lift-spit-bite aluminium etching plate, developed at last weekend’s BIG Etching course with Andrew Baldwin. I chose a soft textured Somerset paper from St. Cuthbert’s Mill and Intaglio Printmaker’s Drypoint Shop Mix etching ink. It’s softer than the usual etching ink, specially designed for delicate drypoint plates, but I fancied using it on this because I like its soft smudginess.

 

I’m very pleased with this first proof of one of the standing stones I have been drawing over the past 2 months. The coffee lift technique is wonderfully free and suits my drawing style – I did most of the drawing onto the aluminium plate with a dip pen and a reed pen. I like the splashes and dribbles, so much more spontaneous than traditional copper plate etching with a hard ground.

Andrew Baldwin’s new book comes out in October in conjunction with the opening of the ‘BIG Exhibition’. The book will give step by step guides to all the processes that can be used with BIG. The call for entries for the exhibition is open from 1st June and is open to all who have made prints using BIG. All entries should first be sent to Andrew via atb@aber.ac.uk. The exhibition will open at The School of Art in October and then travel to other galleries in UK before going over to USA.

I’m travelling around South West Wales with archaeologist Dewi Bowen who is researching his new book on Neolithic / Bronze Age monuments. His previous book on the stones of Ancient Siluria (South East Wales) can be found here. Accompanying us is film maker Melvyn Williams who is recording a documentary about our experiences. Some of Melvyn’s short films can be seen here. I’m currently working on a series of expressive drawings of ancestral sites and if you want to see some of my other artworks, please click here.

 

A Victorian Corset Part 1

25 Aug

Today I started something new. After months of making artwork for my exhibition at Oriel Ceri Richards, I launched into my next piece for a group exhibition at the end of September, “A Victorian Tapestri” based on Victorian Swansea. I’m doing something with cyanotype and a Victorian corset. Cyanotype is an early Victorian method of photography, one of the earliest, invented by the astronomer Sir John Herschel. I am using an historic pattern of a Victorian corset by Butterick and I have cut the pieces out of a heavyweight Somerset printmaking paper, a beautiful soft white, acid-free, cotton, deckle edge paper (250gsm) from St. Cuthbert’s Mill in Wells, Somerset. They’ve been making fine papers there for about 300 years. I like the idea of working with very old patterns, materials and techniques. Now, what am I going to do with it?

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