Tag Archives: Fabriano

Drawing The Artist

21 Jan

mission-jan-2017

Husb and I went to an artist talk at The Mission Gallery in Swansea earlier today. I like to scribble away in my sketchbook when I go to events like this. The artist, ceramicist Anne Gibbs was in conversation with Cath Roche, talking about her new exhibition, “Still“.  I find that if I draw, rather than take written notes, I remember far more, I connect far more. I drew into a sketchbook that I made from recycled pieces of lovely papers, all different. This is a piece of Fabriano that I had previously stained with my home-made walnut ink. I used a Faber Castell Pitt drawing pen, size S.

 

I am putting my series of drawings of ancient Welsh monuments on Artfinder.  If you want to buy one, you can see them by clicking on the image below or the Artfinder link at the top right of this page.

St Elvis

Doing It In Public

1 Oct

galerie-2

This evening Husb and I went to Galerie Simpson for the launch of a new book by local journalist and author Mark Rees, “The Little Book Of Welsh Culture“, part of Swansea’s Purple Flag weekend. I did some ‘live’ drawing of the event, working in public which is always a bit nerve-wracking. I did four drawings in all, over about an hour and a half.

evans

 

I prepared some sheets of paper before I went, a mixture of Italian Fabriano and vintage British papers. I stretched them and then gave them a coat of gesso and when that was dry, painted and drizzled them with my own home-made walnut ink. I don’t like working directly onto white paper. When I started, I used drawing pens at first but they were too fine so I switched to conté crayons in white, sanguine and black, which worked much better.

I did a mixture of individual and group sketches. There’s always a problem with drawing in public, people keep moving about. How very dare they?! ;D

close-up-2

 

There’s more of my art to be seen in my online Gallery in Artfinder, please click on the image below to take a look. Thank you.

Quoit

On Midsummer’s Eve

20 Jun

Rhossili

 

One lovely thing about having visitors is that we get to take people around the great places locally; it’s easy to be complacent about your home and take it for granted. It’s good to see your locality through the eyes of others. Today I took my friend down to Rhossili Bay at the furthest point of the Gower Peninsula. Using Dewi Bowen’s archaeology book as a guide, we climbed up over Rhossili Downs to find ancient stones. Despite the gorgeous Midsummer sunshine, there was a brisk wind which made it difficult to draw. I settled into the heather at the top of the Downs, just past the Trig Point, with the three jagged points of a ruined burial chamber (one of the group called Sweyne’s Howes) in the foreground and the Worm’s Head seeming to swim out to sea in the background. It’s an absolutely glorious location; Rhossili is one of the top 10 beaches in the world and the ancestors sussed it about 5,000 years ago. I drew onto prepared Fabriano Accademica paper with Daler-Rowney artist’s soft pastels.

 

I’ve been travelling around South Wales with archaeologist Dewi Bowen, who is researching his new book on Neolithic / Bronze Age monuments. His previous book on the stones of Ancient Siluria (South East Wales) can be found here. Also with us  is film maker Melvyn Williams, recording a documentary about our experiences. Some of Melvyn’s short films can be seen here. If you want to see some of my other artworks, please click here.

The Quoit Of The King

29 Mar

Manorbier dolmen

Husb and I went for a drive on Easter Monday, exploring some of the South Wales coastline that we hadn’t seen before, the lovely beach of Manorbier / Maenorbŷr in South Pembrokeshire. It’s a very ancient settlement with local evidence of flint microliths from the Mesolithic and Neolithic ages and this magnificent dolmen, The King’s Quoit, looking out over the sea from the cliff path. There are Bronze Age burial mounds, an Iron Age enclosure and evidence of Anglo Saxon farming. The imposing castle and parish church are Norman. It has a railway station and can be reached by train on the lovely West Wales line.

Kings Quoit b

Sometimes the Welsh, Maenorbŷr, is translated as Manor of Pŷr, but an alternative meaning I have seen is ‘Holy (or sacred) Stone’, which would make sense, given the magnificence of this Neolithic burial chamber. The weather was gorgeous, sunny and bright and the beach was busy with families enjoying their Easter break. But it was quite cold and blustery up on the cliff where I settled down to draw the dolmen – you can see what it was like in this short video.

I did this drawing in carbon and white conte crayon onto Fabriano Accademica paper that I had prepared with my home-made walnut ink. This is now for sale in my Artfinder gallery, please click here to see more images of it.

Channelling Cezanne

28 Feb

circle

Each ancient stone monument I visit on my travels across South Wales affects me in different ways and this is being reflected in my drawings. Here at the Neolithic ring cairn atop Mynydd Llangyndeyrn, Carmarthenshire, the angular stones contrasted sharply with the grassy hummocks surrounding them. I’m not interested in doing topographical drawings, I want to try and interpret what I feel about each site.  I found a dry rock (a luxury) to sit on opposite the stones and pulled out a piece of willow charcoal and some marbled Fabriano Accademica paper and just let the charcoal do its own thing. And it started getting a bit Cezanne-ish, the underlying geometry started to emerge to my surprise, I have never drawn like this before but it just seemed to happen that the drawing arranged itself into simple forms and planes.

I’m travelling around with archaeologist Dewi Bowen who is researching his new book. His previous book on the standing stones of Ancient Siluria can be found here. Accompanying us is film maker Melvyn Williams who is recording a documentary about the process. Some of Melvyn’s short films can be seen here. If you want to see more of my artworks, please click here.

See How It Goes

20 Jun

pastel nude

 

I’m going into a phase of experimentation for a while. I have been marbling some Fabriano Accademica paper with black oil pigment and turpentine and I left it out in the garden to dry out; it was quite smelly because of the turps. I forgot about it and it was out overnight and when I looked at it today, snails had attacked it, chewing out some small holes but also munching away at the surface, making it textured in places. Interesting.

I’ve been rooting through old sketchbooks, looking for drawings to work from and I quite like this simple one, done in an olive pastel at a life drawing session. I’ll use it as the basis for drawing onto the marbled paper, with different black and white media; graphite, willow charcoal, carbon, Bideford Black and oil pastel. And see how it goes…….

 

Waste Not, Want Not.

17 Jun

wpid-20150617_162951.jpg

 

So I was working with some fellow artists and one of them, a painter, chucked some black oil paint mixed with turps down the sink. Unfortunately, the sink was blocked so he filled it with water and squeezed some washing up liquid into it and suddenly it went all marbled. So, waste not, want not, I grabbed some of my Fabriano Accademica paper and threw it on top of the water and marbled my paper. It’s been sitting round for a few months and I’d just about forgotten about it until today, when I decided to do some drawing.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

I’ve been working on a series of silkscreen prints over the past few weeks, tight design and a very specific technical process and I wanted to get back to something intuitive, so I grabbed my marbled paper and various black drawing media: some willow charcoal, carbon, compressed charcoal and Bideford Black. And I got stuck in. I used an old life drawing very loosely as a basis and then got into the zone, moving the media across the paper, just letting it happen.

 

Inspiration

10 Oct

There’s a lot of tecchie stuff to do when you’re an artist and today I started scaling up some sketches onto the large pieces of paper I’ve prepared for a series of ‘manier noir’ drawings. I started by soaking some Fabriano Accademica 240gsm and stretching it onto one of my studio walls (good idea to soak the wall a bit first) and when they were dry, gave them 2 coats of acrylic gesso. Then when that was dry, I rubbed the two outer ones with compressed charcoal and the centre one with graphite block and turpentine.

I’ve been sitting looking at them for a couple of weeks now, frustrated because I couldn’t think what to do with them. Then inspiration finally hit today as I sifted through loads of sketches. I now have a good idea of how I want to progress with the series. People sometimes ask me where my inspiration comes from? For me it’s sitting and thinking, searching through reference material; researching from books and t’Internet, but mostly sitting and thinking and not beating myself up because I’m not constantly working on the making of the art.

%d bloggers like this: